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72VW pushing lawmakers to go easier on diesels

The push for more diesel vehicles in North America is finally starting to pick up momentum from non-German automakers like Chrysler, General Motors and Mazda, but there are still hurdles automakers face in winning over American car buyers. To combat this, The Detroit News says that Volkswagen is attempting to get government officials to help level the playing field and even create incentives to promote diesel vehicles.

11Fuel economy numbers are increasing, but still have a long way to go to hit 54.5

The average fuel economy number for new, light duty vehicles sold in the US reached an all-time high of 24.1 miles per gallon in October, up from 23.8 mpg the previous month, according to a report released by the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute.

33U.S. House questions safety, job impact of new CAFE rules

So before we get into having stricter fuel economy standards that will save Americans as much as $1.7 trillion at the pump, let's spend some more money studying the issue a little more, shall we?

37Job creation a big part of selling 54.5 MPG fuel economy standard

The White House is taking its time to issue final federal rules for automakers to reach the 54.5 MPG by 2025 fuel economy standard. To fill the open space, many people are having their say in the matter, to influence the outcome. Three Republican Congressmen, for example, would like to see a delay to further consider higher fuel economy rules on "consumer safety." On the positive side, DrivingGrowth and the Consumer Federation of America say that jobs are being created by fuel efficiency and tha

3Op-Ed: Former GOP Congressman Says 54.5 MPG Rule Is A Good One

New CAFE average will make economy more stable and create new jobs

With election-year headlines trumpeting deep political divisions nationwide and partisan paralysis in Washington, the last thing you might expect to see is a major change in federal energy policy.

6254.5 MPG fuel rule negotiations were not harmonious

If you assumed that the federal mandate requiring automakers to reach the 54.5 miles per gallon corporate average fuel economy standard by 2025 was negotiated cordially and ended in a group hug, think again. Verbal fisticuffs and head butting would be more accurate descriptions, with members of Congress and automakers joining the squabble with the federal regulatory agencies. During the negotiation process, foreign automakers took umbrage with more favorable treatment domestic makers seemed to b

19Fuel efficiency bringing back automotive jobs, but there's more to the story

Consumer demand for fuel efficient vehicles and a federal mandate to reach 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 has helped bring back 236,000 badly-needed U.S. auto industry jobs since 2009, says a report issued by DrivingGrowth. A portion of this growth – 66,300 new jobs – occurred in the Midwest in Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio, along with new jobs in 500 facilities in 43 states that manufacture components and technology that contribute to fuel economy improvements. DrivingGrowth is a proje

12Mazda's SkyActiv technology driving hefty weight loss goal

You may have noticed that Mazda hasn't released a lineup of electric vehicles, hybrids and alternative fuel vehicles. So, how will the automaker reach the demanding 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 federal mandate? By going lightweight and utilizing its Skyactiv technology.

31U.S. drivers to save $68 billion in 2030 with new CAFE standards

What an extra few hundred bucks a year or so in everyone's pocket will buy almost two decades from now is anyone's guess, but for us, that's beside the point.

21Consumer groups back 54.5 mpg standard as hearings commence

Experts have already predicted that toughened fuel efficiency standards will lead to cleaner air and help wean the United States from its reliance on foreign oil. Turns out, they could benefit consumer's wallets too.

143Consumer groups back 54.5 mpg standard as hearings commence

Experts have already predicted that toughened fuel efficiency standards will lead to cleaner air and help wean the United States from its reliance on foreign oil. Turns out, they could benefit consumer's wallets too.

44Darrell Issa asks 15 automakers if higher CAFE level might hurt sales, safety

Darrell Issa is on a mission. The House Republican from California is stepping up his quest to figure out if the new CAFE standards are part of President Obama's "Green-Energy Agenda is Killing Jobs" (Okay, technically, that's Issa's report about Solyndra, but it shows where he's coming from) or potentially affecting safety.

28Volkswagen still fighting new CAFE rules

Which automaker still doesn't like the new CAFE rules? Volkswagen, that's who. After claiming the proposed 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards were biased back in August, VW is again saying, hey, wait a minute, let's not be so dismissive of diesel engines.

11Volkswagen still fighting new CAFE rules

Which automaker still doesn't like the new CAFE rules? Volkswagen, that's who. After claiming the proposed 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards were biased back in August, VW is again saying, hey, wait a minute, let's not be so dismissive of diesel engines.

86Fed proposes new fuel economy standard: 54.5 mpg by 2025

The U.S. Department of Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency and the White House have announced new fuel economy standards for model year 2017-2025 vehicles that will require cars and light trucks to yield a combined 54.5 mpg, as was proposed back in July.

34Fed proposes new fuel economy standard: 54.5 mpg by 2025

The U.S. Department of Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency and the White House have announced new fuel economy standards for model year 2017-2025 vehicles that will require cars and light trucks to yield a combined 54.5 mpg, as was proposed back in July.

20With 2025 CAFE rules, gas engines will remain king

Automakers (except for Volkswagen and Daimler) have shown strong support for the 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard of 54.5 miles per gallon. So, it's time to start gearing up for an onslaught of plug-in vehicles, right? Wrong, says some industry experts.

25Auto engineers skeptical of meeting 2025 CAFE targets... are you?

Most automakers have come out to support the new 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy target of 54.5 miles per gallon. Engineers, however, aren't so sure we're ready to hit that number. Despite a stamp of approval from the Union of Concerned Scientists, the folks that design and build the actual products evidently feel that the CAFE target will not be hit without serious changes to vehicle size and cost.

139Auto engineers skeptical of meeting 2025 CAFE targets... are you?

Most automakers have come out to support the new 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy target of 54.5 miles per gallon. Engineers, however, aren't so sure we're ready to hit that number. Despite a stamp of approval from the Union of Concerned Scientists, the folks that design and build the actual products evidentlyfeel that the CAFE target will not be hit without serious changes to vehicle size and cost.

AddWorld Report, 7/29: Obama Raises CAFE Standard And More

Welcome to TRANSLOGIC World Report: your weekly roundup of transportation tech news from around the web.

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