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When the book The Secret and the law of attraction was all the rage, one of the most common examples we heard of how people used their innate ability to create whatever they wanted in the world was some variation on, "I envisioned there being an open parking spot." Now you can skip the book and the visualizations with the global parking navigation service launched by Inrix at the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show.


Automakers aren't necessarily known for their sharing skills unless some sort of mutual agreement is in place, but it seems that Ford is looking to create a universal architecture based on its Sync AppLink on which other companies (including rival automakers) can run in-car apps free of charge. With the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show going on, Wired sat down with Ford's Doug VanDagens, director of connected services, who talked about what such a tech-sharing plan could do for Ford and the indust


Among the numerous apps that Ford has added to its Sync AppLink system is the location-sharing service Glympse. After The app is installed on a smartphone and the phone is paired with the AppLink interface either through Bluetooth or USB, a driver just presses the Sync button on the steering wheel and says, "Send Glympse." With that, the vehicle's location is sent to the other parties he has enabled in the app.


Get in just about any mid-level Chrysler product these days, and you'll see a touchscreen head unit that would be perfect for a navigation system. The only thing is that some of these cars equipped with the head unit for Chrysler's Uconnect infotainment system were not optioned up with navigation at the time of purchase, leaving drivers looking for turn-by-turn directions relying on either an aftermarket nav system or a smartphone. Starting on select new Chrysler products, however, customers wit

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