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Back when Honda launched the Crosstour in 2010, it fielded questions from the media asking why it chose to forego a four-cylinder model. At the time, officials indicated that a four-cylinder engine would result in minimal fuel economy improvements, noting that the company's aim was to target premium-minded customers for whom the 3.5-liter V6 seemed more appropriate.

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Ever since the launch of the, uh, polarizing Honda Crosstour, the rumormill has been buzzing with word that Honda might someday add a four-cylinder engine to the lineup. Makes sense, since the Accord on which it's based offers a four-pot, and the CUV's key competitor, the Toyota Venza, also offers a more efficient four-cylinder powertrain.

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In a roundtable with reporters at an event related to the Tokyo Motor Show, Tetsuo Iwamura, President and CEO of American Honda, told us that he's been surprised by the Crosstour crossover's slow sales:

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Ah, the Honda Crosstour. The oddly shaped, curiously impractical crossover carries on for another model year, albeit with a slightly shortened name. That's right, for 2012, Honda has dropped the 'Accord' name from the Crosstour, meaning it will now have to stand alone in the automaker's lineup (and on the company's sales charts, natch).

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