LaFontaine Toyota in Dearborn, Michigan
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

LaFontaine Toyota in Dearborn, Michigan

We visited LaFontaine Toyota in Dearborn, Michigan to see how the Japanese automaker plans on fixing their vehicles for consumers.
The half-a-billion dollar fix
  • Image Credit: Reilly Brennan, AOL Autos

The half-a-billion dollar fix

Toyota sent metal shims of various sizes to all its dealers during the week of February 1, 2010.
Master Technican Doug Kropp
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

Master Technican Doug Kropp

LaFontaine Toyota's Doug Kropp walked us through the installation process.
Metal Shim Close Up
  • Image Credit: Reilly Brennan, AOL Autos

Metal Shim Close Up

The shims are no bigger than a dime and come in 7 different thicknesses.
1. Identify the right part
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

1. Identify the right part

The technician checks the pedal to see if it's one of the recalled pedal systems. If it's on the recall list, it should have the installation procedure.
2. Remove the pedal from the vehicle
  • Image Credit: Reilly Brennan, AOL Autos

2. Remove the pedal from the vehicle

After identifying the pedal is a part of the recall, the technician removes it from the car. The pedal comes out by unplugging its wiring harness and removing two screws.
3. Measure
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

3. Measure

Next, the technician uses a feeler gauge to measure the distance of the space between the bottom of the pedal housing and the spring housing.
4. Installing the insert
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

4. Installing the insert

Based on his measurements, the technician picks the right insert from the parts bin, then carefully slides it inside the pedal assembly.
5. Does it feel right?
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

5. Does it feel right?

The technician gives the pedal 5 pumps to see if the feel of the unit has been compromised.
6. Reinstall and check the vehicle
  • Image Credit: Sam Abuelsamid, Autoblog

6. Reinstall and check the vehicle

If it feels right, he puts it back in the vehicle. Next, the technician plugs in his mobile diagnosis unit and runs a complete software check of the car. If all systems are go, the customer gets his or her car back. The total time for this takes about 30 minutes according to estimates from LaFontaine Toyota.


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