1912 Classic Six

1912 Classic Six

We had no choice but to include the car that started it all in this list: The 1912 Classic Six. Based on the racing cars loved by Louis Chevrolet, this upscale car was powered by a huge liquid-cooled, 299-cubic-inch, six-cylinder cast-iron block engine. The Classic Six topped out at 65 MPH, which competed with the high-performance cars of its time.

1936 Suburban

1936 Suburban

The 1936 Suburban was a revolutionary utility vehicle designed to transport families. The affordable car could comfortably seat up to 8 people and their luggage. Incredibly, the Suburban nameplate has carried on for 75 years and GM estimates that around 2.4 million have been built.

1948 Pickup

1948 Pickup

The post-war boom called for a vehicle that could serve as more than just a daily driver for millions of Americans. The 1948 Chevrolet Pickup answered that call. This vehicle became the workhorse for America, as its "Unisteel Battleship" construction gave it the versatility and practicality Americans needed to simply get things done.

1953 Corvette

1953 Corvette

The 1953 Corvette was never intended to actually be built for the public. But, after people showed overwhelming support of the show car at the Waldorf-Astoria Motorama in New York City, GM decided to produce it. The first Corvettes were built by hand in the back of a customer delivery garage in Flint, MI and due to their popularity, GM had to firmly control their distribution.

1957 Bel Air

1957 Bel Air

This 1957 Bel Air is one of the first cars that come to mind when people consider the term "Classic Car." Its wraparound windshield, huge chrome bumper, wind splits and tail fins were hugely popular with the public and today designate this ride as an American icon.

1963 Corvette Sting Ray

1963 Corvette Sting Ray

Ten years after the debut of the original Corvette, Chevrolet released a bold new design in the form of the 1963 Sting Ray. It was the first American car to have an independent rear suspension and featured the Corvette's iconic hideaway headlights. The Sting Ray was also very affordable, allowing the average working man to enjoy a true sports car.

1969 Camaro

1969 Camaro

The 1969 Camaro was the last in the line of one of the most popular car designs in automotive history. Both beautiful and powerful, this Camaro captured the hearts of auto enthusiasts everywhere. It was the only model year that offered the legendary ZL1 engine and, with its Z28 RS/SS package, the Camaro could actually compete in the Trans-Am Racing Series.

1970 Chevelle SS

1970 Chevelle SS

It's hard to believe, but this 450-hp sedan that could reach 100 MPH in under 13 seconds was actually built to be a "family car." The 1970 Chevelle SS had, at the time, the highest factory horsepower rating for a production car and today is widely considered one of the best muscle cars of all time. Sunday drives with the kids would never be the same.

2009 Corvette ZR1

2009 Corvette ZR1

The 2009 Corvette ZR1 is Chevrolet's fastest production vehicle of all time, topping out at a blistering 205 MPH. This is the car that in 2010 actually beat out Lamborghinis and Porsches in Car and Driver's Lightning Lap Competition. It's remarkable how a car that was never intended to be built evolved into one of the most revered sports cars on the planet.

2011 Volt

2011 Volt

The 2011 Volt ushered in a new era of automotive engineering. Employing an electric motor that can be recharged by an on-board gas generator, it is currently the most fuel-efficient compact car in the U.S. The Volt can travel about 40 miles on an electric charge (which you can get at home or at a charging station), after which the gas powered generator kicks in, giving the car more juice for extended sessions on the road.



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