• Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum


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    The National Corvette Museum wants to recreate the sinkhole everyday in a miniature version of the Skydome. While standing in an artificial cave, visitors can watch an imitation of the eight 'Vettes falling in.

    The massive sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum is now completely filled in. The museum is holding a contest to guess how many tons of stone it took to make things right again.

    Since the catastrophe, attendance has shot up 59 percent.

    The people at the National Corvette Museum are hoping to turn a catastrophe into an opportunity for continued success. Since all eight cars eaten by the 40-foot wide and 60-foot deep sinkhole were removed and put on display, the museum has seen an uptick in visitors to check the wrecked 'Vettes out. According to CNN, attendance was up over 50 percent for March. The next step might be stabilizing the hole and making it a permanent part of the Skydome hall along with some of the most damaged cars.

    The 2001 Chevrolet Corvette Mallett Hammer Z06 has been plucked out of the sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum, but it definitely couldn't drive away like the 2009 ZR1 did when it came out. With the Mallet finally recovered, all eight 'Vettes that went into the hole are finally out after eight weeks of work. As you probably know, a 40-foot wide and 60-foot deep hole appeared in the museum's Skydome in early February, enveloping some of the rarest cars on display. General Motors plans to res

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