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You didn't think you'd heard the last from Mahindra, did you? Back in July of 2012, Mahindra confirmed that it had basically given up its quest to sell small diesel-powered pickup trucks in the United States. According to a report from TheDetroitBureau.com, however, the Indian automaker is now opening a technical center in Troy, Michigan, near Detroit.

With apologies to the Beatles, it's been a long and winding road for those waiting to get their hands on the steering wheel of a small, diesel-powered pickup from Mahindra. Here's the good news: Something definitive has finally been heard from the Indian automaker. Here's the bad news: It's bad news.

With apologies to the Beatles, it's been a long and winding road for those waiting to get their hands on the steering wheel of a small, diesel-powered pickup from Mahindra. Here's the good news: Something definitive has finally been heard from the Indian automaker. Here's the bad news: It's bad news.

In 2004, Indian automaker Mahindra & Mahindra began courting U.S. auto dealers to build a network of outlets for its trucks and SUVs. Eventually, the company had accumulated $9.5 million in fees from prospective dealers itching to sell Mahindra-branded vehicles.

It appears that a British arbitration panel has shattered any hopes of seeing a small diesel Mahindra pickup truck in the States. According to PickupTrucks.com, the panel ruled in favor of the Indian automaker in Global Vehicles' lawsuit against the company, saying the contract between the two companies had expired. Furthermore, Mahindra was not found to have violated any U.S. laws. The ruling is the final chapter in a saga that began six years ago when the companies announced that Global Vehicl

Fans of small, fuel-efficient pickup trucks: We hate to tell you this, but it's becoming increasingly clear that Mahindra's long-awaited entry into the United States market just isn't going to happen anytime soon. We're just as disappointed as the rest of you – with the recent demise of the Ford Ranger, there simply aren't any truly compact trucks left in American dealership showrooms.

Never before has such a little truck had to haul so much baggage. It's been years that we've waited for Mahindra's T20 and T40 pickups to finally make it to America, and with a dispute between Mahindra & Mahindra's erstwhile U.S. Importer, GV USA, taking a long time to be settled by arbitrators in London, and dealers filing suits against both Mahindra and GV USA. With GV USA having gone out of business in September, it might be years before we ever see the T20 and T40.

PickupTrucks.com reports that – surprise, surprise – it may be a very, very long time before we seen the Mahindra T20 and T40 pickup truck on our shores. The Indian automaker has found itself at the center of a legal tempest after its U.S. distributor, Global Vehicles USA, filed suit alleging breach of contract. An arbitration panel in the UK then claimed sole jurisdiction over any dispute against the two, and Global Vehicles agreed to drop the lawsuit to take its case to the arbiter

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