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Honda will bring its FCV Concept to the 2015 North American International Auto Show in Detroit in January. The hydrogen-powered concept made its Japanese debut in November, and will now make its way to North America for the first time. The FCV concept improves upon the design of the FCX Clarity with a more striking appearance and roomier interior. Its smaller powertrain packaging means more space for people, and the FCV Concept seats five passengers. Honda also expects the next-generation fuel-c

Read his lips: more hydrogen stations, please. That's the crux of the commentary from a Southern California gentleman who's been tooling around in a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel-cell electric vehicle since 2005.

We're not sure how "hydrogen superhighway" translates in Japanese, but it looks like Japan is looking to promote the kind of public-private partnership to accelerate hydrogen-refueling infrastructure that the US government has espoused at various times, Hydrogen Fuel News reports.

In January, Ford, Daimler and Nissan announced they would all work together on fuel cell technology. Toyota is getting ready for its own 2015 fuel cell car. Hyundai is delivering H2 vehicles today. The Department of Energy has a plan called H2USA. Put all this together, and the future of the hydrogen vehicle is finally getting a little clearer. Especially with today's announcement that General Motors and Honda have signed a "long-term, definitive master agreement" that will co-develop next-gener

Honda has joined up with industry colleagues and become a member of the H2USA partnership dedicated to the development and commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The US Department of Energy program was started up last month and includes Toyota, Mercedes, Hyundai, Nissan and other manufacturers, government agencies and suppliers.

Here's a story that certainly plays to stereotypes: a new network of hydrogen refueling stations being built in Japan are the work of, surprise, oil companies. As The Japan Times reports, JX Nippon Oil & Energy Corp. and 12 other companies – including automakers – are working together to establish about 100 new H2 stations, mostly in major cities.

More states may follow the Golden State in plug-in vehicle quotas, which could make auto executives see red.

Honda is looking to test out its fuel cell FCX Clarity by putting casual users in its passenger seats with an experiment at Tokyo's Narita International Airport. According to the automaker, an undisclosed amount of FCX Clarity sedans are now in motion at and around Narita Airport. The fuel cell vehicles will be used to chauffeur passengers from the airport to downtown Tokyo, a distance of around 45 miles.

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