• Image Credit: Google
  • Image Credit: Google

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Females Surveyed Also Have Greater Safety Concerns

Drivers are intrigued by the benefits of self-driving cars, but they remain concerned about the safety and cost such vehicles could introduce into the marketplace, according to a study published by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute in late July.

An increasing number of people are starting to consider the potential downsides of a transition to autonomous cars. The FBI is already looking at them for the potential ill effects on law enforcement, and a scientist for Toyota is raising the possibility that driverless vehicles could actually be detrimental to the environment over the long term.

At what point does a car cease to be a car and start becoming a people-mover? One survey hints that we're less than two decades away from that eventuality. Whether auto enthusiasts think that's a good thing is another matter altogether.

Google's self-driving car caused a stir last week with people debating whether they would really want to give up complete control of a vehicle to a vehicle. The tech giant has been working with autonomous versions of the Toyota Prius and Lexus RX for years, but if the situation ever got a little too much like Westworld, the driver could always take over. Its latest creation eschews that ability, putting the computers entirely in control. Comedian Conan O'Brien realized that there still could be

Anything that takes guesswork of ordinary commutes can only be a good thing. More often than not, driving is a pain in the seat.

Roush has a pretty booming business. Not only does it build some seriously raucous Ford-based products, but it's also got its fingers in racing, transportation and military manufacturing. Now, rumor has it that Roush might be adding one more feather to its cap, as it may be in cahoots with Google to build the California tech giant's new fully autonomous car.

Welcome to the future, friends. Google has unveiled its first self-driving car. This isn't like past attempts, though. It's not a Toyota Prius or Lexus RX with a bunch of bulky computer equipment, but Google's very own car, built from scratch. That'd be a big enough deal in and of itself, but this car is exciting for another reason – there are no manual controls. No brake pedal, gas pedal, gear shift or steering wheel. It's completely and totally autonomous, requiring nothing more than an