The 10th annual 'Allstate America's Best Drivers Report' is out, with some surprises since last year.

Using insurance claims made through insurance giant Allstate, the report ranks America's 200 largest cities based on which has the best and worst drivers. This year, Brownsville, Texas, jumped 21 spots to make it into the top five best cities for drivers. Older, more populous and congested cities like Baltimore and Washington, D.C., scored low in terms of safety.

Boston -- famous for its especially awful traffic patterns that date back to 18th-century streets, schizophrenic roads and aggressive drivers -- received a pass in this report, as Allstate doesn't operate in Massachusetts. Lucky for Boston. Click through to see where your city ranks. 

Most Dangerous - 1. Washington D.C.

Most Dangerous - 1. Washington D.C.

The nation's capital is known for its gnarly traffic jams and devil-may-care drivers. The 295-295-495-95 highway system is maddening. Street parking is a nightmare. Red light cameras are peppered throughout the city. And the city's street pattern makes for a maze of one-ways and no-left-turns. Is it any wonder that Washingtonians crash on average every 4.8 years and spend 40.5 hours per car per year in traffic? 
Most Dangerous - 2. Baltimore, Md.

Most Dangerous - 2. Baltimore, Md.

With an accident ever 5.4 years, residents of Charm City follow close behind nearby Washington. Older, larger cities are less likely to rise from their low ranks because they have less room to address systemic traffic problems
Most Dangerous - 3. Providence, R.I.

Most Dangerous - 3. Providence, R.I.

Just one percentage point divides Providence and  Baltimore on the list. Residents of one of America's oldest New England cities go only six years between collisions. 
Most Dangerous - 4. Hialeah, Fla.

Most Dangerous - 4. Hialeah, Fla.

This Florida city, the state's sixth largest, may be fourth for accidents, but when they hit someone they hit hard. The city, which has the curious distinction of having the densest population among American cities without a skyscraper, ranks third for traffic fatalities.  
Most Dangerous - 5. Glendale, Calif.

Most Dangerous - 5. Glendale, Calif.

Glendale is part of a cluster of Californian cities that made it into the top 25 worst cities to drive in. But here is good news. If you die in a car crash, you might be able to get into Forest Lawn cemetery in the city, which is the final home to some of the most famous celebrities and movie stars to ever grace the silver screen.
Safest - 1. Fort Collins, Colo.

Safest - 1. Fort Collins, Colo.

Drivers in this charming mountain city go the longest between crashes, 13.9 years. Pretty good for one of the largest beer brewing cities in the nation. 
Safest - 2. Boise, Idaho

Safest - 2. Boise, Idaho

The most populous city in Idaho is also one of the safest to drive in. Boise also sports the fifth lowest car insurance rates in the country.
Safest - 3. Sioux Falls, S.D.

Safest - 3. Sioux Falls, S.D.

Residents of Sioux Falls enjoy some 70 beautiful parks and greenways. All that placid space to relax must make residents calm drivers as they go an average of 12.8 years between crashes.
Safest - 4. Brownsville, Texas

Safest - 4. Brownsville, Texas

Maybe it's the tropical climate? Brownsville rose 21 spots this year to reach the top five cities for safe driving despite being one of the fastest growing urban areas in the US. 
Safest - 5. Madison, Wis.

Safest - 5. Madison, Wis.

Midwestern cities fared much better on Allstate's list than the old East Coast giants. Known for it's laid-back, college town lifestyle, Madison also sports wide streets and easy freeway access, which cuts down on rear end bumps that make up the majority of Allstate claims. 


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