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Since its introduction in 2008, the Nissan GT-R has seen a steady increase of power and price almost every year, but the big news for the next-gen supercar might be an increase in production. Automotive News recently spoke with newly appointed GT-R chief engineer Kinishi Tanuma who said Nissan needs "more of a volume car." Nissan has sold a little more than 2,000 GT-Rs in the US since 2012 – 1,188 last year and 952 so far this year.

With all-wheel drive, launch control and a dual-clutch transmission, the Nissan GT-R may be easier to manage than most supercars. But that doesn't mean that dragging one on a wet strip is a good idea.

Patent and trademark filings are sort of like tasseography for those of us in the auto industry. If you know where and how to look at something, there's a lot to be figured out. Take this trademark filing from Nissan - it's similar to the Pure Drive badge found on a Versa or Sentra, but the bottom half sports the phrase "R-Hybrid." This wouldn't be remarkable if the "R" in R-Hybrid weren't the same style as the "R" in the Nissan GT-R's badge, right down to the serifs.

"Handbuilt by Takumi Kurosawa," a nameplate you can find on Nissan GT-R engine blocks, describes the actions of one of four takumi who build VR38 engines for the Japanese supercar. Each of Nissan's four artisans ensure that every twin-turbo V6 receives the utmost in care and feeding from the moment each component enters the clean room for assembly.

Chasing The Legend