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Years after its original debut, the Nissan GT-R remains a much-feared, well-regarded entry in the sports car landscape. Sure, many of its original competitors are onto new generations these days, but Nissan has continually improved the GT-R, giving it meaningful tweaks almost every year since it came to the US market for 2009. Reviewers also just seem to keep finding things to praise about the all-wheel drive, turbocharged coupe. In this episode of Epic Drives, the GT-R proves that in addition t

The only reason we have the Nissan GT-R is because of the exploits of all those GT-Rs we didn't get, and it started with the first one, a model at the time called the Skyline GT, at the 1964 Grand Prix at Suzuka. It was there that modified Prince Motor Company Skyline sedans, only just homologated and never raced, took the green flag and drifted their way to second through sixth places.

One of the most integral pieces of the Nissan GT-R legacy is the Japanese automaker's commitment to improving the car every single year, rather than waiting for a mid-cycle refresh. While an accountant at Nissan may favor the latter method, it is quite apparent that the GT-R's development team is more focused on the pursuit of performance perfection. While we have brought you some details on the mechanical updates to the GT-R, a recent video featuring lead engineer Kazutoshi Mizuno explains the

I always figured that the first six-figure Nissan I drove would have an Infiniti badge on the front, but this $107,600 as-tested 2013 GT-R Black Edition has given lie to that notion.