This isn't deja vu. We did run a review of a very similar-looking vehicle that had a very similar name not all that long ago – the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport.

This, however, is the Hyundai Santa Fe. It's the bigger, longer-wheelbase CUV in what has become the Santa Fe family, a subset of Hyundai's crossover family. It replaces the Veracruz as Hyundai's big, three-row family hauler.

It sounds a little confusing, we know. Here is how the Korean automaker's crossover line now looks, in order of smallest to biggest, with the Santa Fe introduction: Hyundai Tucson, Santa Fe Sport and Santa Fe. 

Available in two configurations – the seven-passenger GLS and six-passenger Limited – the Santa Fe looks to provide buyers with a stylish minivan alternative, combining comfort, versatility, passenger space and quality all into one package for a low price.

Hyundai has been quite successful in packaging vehicles in such a way with many of its smaller offerings, but taking a crack at the midsize SUV is a different animal. It's a homogenous segment dominated by family-friendly names like Toyota and Honda. Hyundai has to stand out if it wants to sell these CUVs.

So is the Santa Fe good enough to win over moms in dads in suburban America? Click through to see what I liked – and didn't – about the 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe.

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MSRP: $28,350 - $34,850
Invoice Price: $27,035 - $32,790
As Tested (with options): $35,695

Engine: 3.3-liter V6

Transmission: 6-speed automatic

Performance: 290 hp, 252 lb-ft of torque

Fuel Economy: 18 mpg city, 25 mpg highway

Seating: 6 or 7 people

Cargo: 80 cubic feet

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There's not much that distinguishes the Santa Fe from the Santa Fe Sport except that, you know, it's bigger. That's not a bad thing. This is a handsome car with nice curves, a sporty fascia and a wide variety of attractive colors to choose from.

The few minor differences between this car and the Sport aren't evident at first glance, but they include different bodyside character lines from the B-pillar back, a different grille and chrome-tipped dual exhaust.

Hyundai has done a good job in differentiating the Santa Fe from its competition. As SUVs continue to look more and more alike as automakers make similar design tweaks to improve fuel economy, it's the little things like these chrome accents, nice big wheels and a distinctive front end that keep cars like the Santa Fe from blending in with the crowd.

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Like the exterior, much of the interior is the same as the Santa Fe Sport, with the obvious exception of overall volume. Up front, Hyundai has kept the interior appointments of the Sport, which I'm quite happy about. 

Hyundai paid close attention to detail with this interior, ensuring that most of the touch points are soft, the controls are ergonomically placed, the cabin is quiet and the seats are comfortable. It all comes together almost seamlessly, creating one of the best interiors in the CUV class as a whole. It's truly a relaxing place to be a driver, whether you're on a road trip or a simple jaunt to the store.

Hyundai didn't neglect the passengers in the second and third rows, either, which is considerate. Even those relegated to the very back can enjoy their own climate controls, storage spots and cupholders. Nice touches.

Overall, the inside of the Santa Fe is a great example of Hyundai doing what it does best: Creating a legitimately premium look and feel for a great price.

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Cargo and passenger space are both impressive in the Santa Fe.

Drivers and front-seat passengers are treated to copious amounts of head-and-shoulder room up front. The second row is also quite roomy in both the two- and three-passenger configurations. The midsize Santa Fe has almost 2 more inches of legroom in this row than the Santa Fe Sport, which should ensure a comfortable commute for most passengers -- even the tall ones.

Space in the third row isn't bad either. Generally, riding in the back row of a midsize SUV is an experience only children and professional contortionists can possibly enjoy. But, with the Santa Fe, it's palatable. Granted, I didn't spend a ton of time back there, but I'm willing to bet I could have survived an hour or two.

With 80 cubic feet of cargo capacity, the world is your oyster. Seats can be folded down to make enough room for bicycles or any other large toy, suitcase or home improvement product.

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A midsize SUV isn't really supposed to be an engaging vehicle to drive. Rather, its dynamics should appeal to those looking for a vehicle that is smooth, quiet and easy to handle. The Santa Fe is all of these things.

It's also quite heavy, however, which does affect the way it drives. The AWD Santa Fe struggled a bit getting up to speed, especially on inclines. Attempting to pass some trucks while we were driving in the mountains was dicey, as the engine strained to get us moving fast enough in a short distance. Things were a little better in the FWD variation, but acceleration still isn't great.

I don't think this is a deal-breaker, though. Most drivers aren't attempting to pass on mountain roads and the amount of torque produced by the 3.3L V6 engine should be more than adequate to get you up to speed on highway on-ramps. 

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Are you shopping for a new car this month? Check out our Car Compare tool!

It allows you to compare two to five cars to see how they compare on on price, features and performance.

Hyundai's tech and infotainment interface is a personal favorite of mine. I think it's clean, quick and intuitive. It's the same system employed by the Santa Fe Sport, as well as other vehicles in Hyundai's line.

The problem is it's an expensive option. If you want the 8-inch touchscreen interface, you'll have to pay $4,000 to get the Leather and Navigation Package on the GLS model or $2,900 for the Technology Package on the Limited. Yikes.

The sound system is solid, especially if you choose to upgrade to the 10-speaker Dimension or 550-watt Infinity Logic 7 surround sound option. After all, if you and your family are going to rock out to "Wheels On The Bus," you may as well do it big.

Another good tech feature of the Santa Fe is Hyundai BlueLink, which is a safety, service and infortainment feature similar to that of GM's OnStar. It includes voice text messaging, POI search, turn-by-turn navigation, monthly vehicle reporting and more. I'm a fan of the system and buyers of this vehicle receive a complimentary trial which can be extended for a monthly fee.

Interestingly, there's no rear seat entertainment option (TV with DVD player). Hyundai's reasoning for this is that since so many families have tablets and laptop computers nowadays, putting such a unit into a car has basically become moot.

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Fuel economy is rated at 18 mpg City, 25 mpg Highway for FWD models and 18 mpg City, 24 mpg Highway for AWD models. Given how it's becoming commonplace to see numbers in the 30s, especially from Hyundai, these may seem disappointing. But you have to remember that this car is big and it takes a good amount of gas to get it going.

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This is a great family vehicle, plain and simple. People still need three-row SUVs in this country, that's a fact, and it's great to see that Hyundai is taking it seriously and delivering on what people truly desire in their family haulers.

The Santa Fe is giving buyers all of the benefits of a minivan -- tons of cargo and passenger space, a smooth ride, easy entrance/exit -- without forcing people to take on the uncool image that comes with actually driving a minivan (though we at AOL Autos think that's really unfortunate -- minivans are great).

The Santa Fe is available with tons of standard equipment, a great interior, handsome looks and a level of refinement you just don't expect at this price point.

American families, you should definitely have this on your shopping list.

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