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    Confusion May Reign

    Plug-in vehicle makers are losing out on sales dollars because the mileage ratings don't make a lot of sense. That's what one Venture Beat writer says after buying a Toyota Prius Plug-in and trying to apply the miles per gallon equivalent (MPGe) standard to real-world results. In short, it's difficult to do.

    Compared to last year's model, there's not much that's new in the 2014 Toyota Prius Plug-In hybrid –except the price tag. The nominally updated PHEV will lose $2,010 off of its base price while keeping all of the tech and options from the 2013 model. The new base model will therefore start at $29,990, while the Prius Plug-in Advanced model gets an even bigger cut – $4,620 - and will now start at $34,905. Those prices do not include destination fees, which Toyota has not revealed (not

    What did those "Helping Hands" end up doing, push the dang car for a month? Toyota in late May announced its first-ever Prius MPG Challenge pitting non-profits against each other for bragging rights over who could use the least amount of gas driving their Prius Plug-in. With the "wave one" results now in, the winner was New Jersey's Helping Hands Food Pantry, which almost quadrupled the Prius Plug-in's EPA-rated 95 miles per gallon-equivalent (MPGe) rating by getting 356 MPGe over 506 miles. Yes

    Sure, it's a PR play to raise awareness for the Toyota Prius Plug-in, but Toyota's first-ever Prius MPG Challenge is for a good cause. Fifteen of them, for starters.

    Hybrids, plug-in hybrids and electric vehicles will account for about one in 16 new vehicles sold globally by the end of the decade, consulting agency PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) says. The increase will come as automakers reduce the price premium on advanced-powertrain vehicles and governments invest more in charging infrastructure, PwC says.

    Fleet owners in the Netherlands are finding out that you can overshoot the mark by 80 percent in fuel consumption with plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Leasing company Arval (which is known in the US as major fleet management and leasing company PHH Arval) surveyed fleets leasing the Opel Ampera, Chevrolet Volt and Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid and found that they're using, on average, 80 percent more fuel than the fuel economy estimates found in the manufacturers' specifications.

    The Toyota Prius, the most popular hybrid in the world, was also the most popular plug-in vehicle in U.S. last month.

    The Toyota Prius, the most popular hybrid in the world, was also the most popular plug-in vehicle in U.S. last month.

    The brand-new Toyota Prius Plug-In has arrived in California, and Toyota wants to make sure that potential buyers know that the plug-in hybrid can be up to $4,000 dollars lower than the sticker price might make it seem, plus other benefits.

    Toyota has boosted the miles-per-gallon-equivalent (MPGe) ratings for the Prius Plug-in hybrid-electric that it plans to debut in the U.S. next month. The Japanese automaker now estimates that the car will get 95 MPGe in its all-electric mode, up from its prior estimate of 87 MPGe, according to Toyota Division Group Vice President Bob Carter and cited by multiple media outlets.

    The Prius Plug-in Hybrid has a price: $32,000. That's the just-announced MSRP for the base plug-in hybrid, with the top-of-the-line Prius Plug-in Hybrid Advanced jumping all the way up to $39,525. Because the both of these Prius Plug-in models have a 4.4-kWh, 176 pound battery pack, it should qualify for a federal tax credit of $2,500. Toyota has also announced that the larger Prius V, which does not qualify for any tax incentives, will start at $26,400. *All vehicles are subject to a $760 deliv

    The Prius Plug-in Hybrid has a price: $32,000. That's the just-announced MSRP for the base plug-in hybrid, with the top-of-the-line Prius Plug-in Hybrid Advanced jumping all the way up to $39,525. Because the both of these Prius Plug-in models have a 4.4-kWh, 176 pound battery pack, it should qualify for a federal tax credit of $2,500. Toyota has also announced that the larger Prius V, which does not qualify for any tax incentives, will start at $26,400. *All vehicles are subject to a $760 deliv

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