2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests

  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests
  • 2011 Chevrolet Volt crash tests


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    It's a safe wager that no one expected the report of the Chevrolet Volt fire after a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration crash test to turn into a Congressional dressing-down. The short story: NHTSA crash-tested a Volt in May, that car caught fire in June while in storage, and NHTSA alerted the public about the fire in November. Certain politicians have wondered if politics played a part in waiting until November to report the fire, and now a House panel is holding a hearing called "V

    Regular readers probably know the story of the Chevrolet Volt NHTSA post-crash fire by heart, but here are the important details as a refresher: The original car that triggered the investigation was crash tested by NHTSA in May. Three weeks later, in early June, the same car caught fire while in storage. The outside world first heard about the incident in November.

    Spontaneous combustion concerns weeks after a crash may prompt General Motors to spend about $1,000 per Chevrolet Volt to fix, according to a report from Reuters. The proposed fixes, which would cost a total of $9 million, would likely include reinforcements around vulnerable areas of the car's battery pack, lamination of electric circuitry and better protection for the coolant system to stop leaks.

    Spontaneous combustion concerns weeks after a crash may prompt General Motors to spend about $1,000 per Chevrolet Volt to fix, according to a report from Reuters. The proposed fixes, which would cost a total of $9 million, would likely include reinforcements around vulnerable areas of the car's battery pack, lamination of electric circuitry and better protection for the coolant system to stop leaks.

    In the wake of a post-accident fire at a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration facility and with a safety probe underway, GM is considering a redesign of the battery used in the plug-in hybrid Chevy Volt.

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