LS 4x2
2015 Chevrolet Tahoe

MSRP ?

$46,300
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 5.3LV-8
MPG MPG 16 City / 23 Hwy
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2015 Tahoe Overview

Remember the SUV-asaurus? As a character in an ad campaign, it made us chuckle, the general gist being that the huge sport-utility vehicles of years past were hopelessly out of date, falling prey to higher gas prices and a shifting consumer attitude toward more efficient transportation, namely the car-based crossover. While no specific manufacturer was targeted (besides Suzuki, of course, as it was the brand that paid for the ad campaign), there were a few fullsize SUVs clearly wearing crosshairs – most obviously the Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban and their corporate Yukon and Yukon XL twins from GMC. Humorous as it may have been to poke fun at a would-be dodo, it seems the grave meant for the fullsize body-on-frame SUV may have been dug rather prematurely (ironically, the burial plot ended up being for Suzuki itself, at least here in the States). Proof positive can be seen in the 2015 Chevy Tahoe that is the subject of today's feature. It's a completely redesigned machine, and it holds an important place in the automaker's lineup – according to General Motors, fullsize SUVs make up 1.6 percent of the US vehicle market (2.2 percent if you include luxury nameplates), and GM owns a whopping 74 percent of that chunk. Add it all up and that equals 263,948 sales in 2013. What's more, these aren't low-dollar sales, with an average transaction price of $53,000, and they are known to have particularly huge profit margins. So, we've established that fullsize SUVs aren't yet dead, Chevrolet and GMC are two of the biggest players in the segment and, importantly, that the market is lucrative. It was with these facts in mind that we slid behind the wheel of the 2015 Chevy Tahoe. Just who is it that are buying up these massive utilities, and what are the specific virtues that lead to their continued success? Let's find out. To our eyes, it looks more purposeful than pretty. When looking through an out-of-focus lens, just about any fullsize body-on-frame sport utility is going to appear mostly like a big box on wheels. Fortunately, Chevy has gone to great lengths to give the Tahoe a distinctive look. Whether it's an attractive vehicle, though, is certainly up for debate. To our eyes, it looks more purposeful than pretty, with a handsome profile that's a bit spoiled by the strangely shaped headlamp clusters and massive, upright chrome grille. If you don't like the look of the Tahoe, remember that there's a probably a GMC dealer close by with a sales floor full of Yukons, which we think look quite a bit prettier. The good news is that its long, straight lines and vertical stance mean its interior is large, bright and airy. Seats are comfortable, and the leather surfaces of our LTZ tester were soft and supple. In front of the driver sits a cluster with easy-to-read gauges, including a large tachometer on the left, a matching speedometer on the right and a row of four smaller ancillaries …
Full Review

2015 Tahoe Overview

Remember the SUV-asaurus? As a character in an ad campaign, it made us chuckle, the general gist being that the huge sport-utility vehicles of years past were hopelessly out of date, falling prey to higher gas prices and a shifting consumer attitude toward more efficient transportation, namely the car-based crossover. While no specific manufacturer was targeted (besides Suzuki, of course, as it was the brand that paid for the ad campaign), there were a few fullsize SUVs clearly wearing crosshairs – most obviously the Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban and their corporate Yukon and Yukon XL twins from GMC. Humorous as it may have been to poke fun at a would-be dodo, it seems the grave meant for the fullsize body-on-frame SUV may have been dug rather prematurely (ironically, the burial plot ended up being for Suzuki itself, at least here in the States). Proof positive can be seen in the 2015 Chevy Tahoe that is the subject of today's feature. It's a completely redesigned machine, and it holds an important place in the automaker's lineup – according to General Motors, fullsize SUVs make up 1.6 percent of the US vehicle market (2.2 percent if you include luxury nameplates), and GM owns a whopping 74 percent of that chunk. Add it all up and that equals 263,948 sales in 2013. What's more, these aren't low-dollar sales, with an average transaction price of $53,000, and they are known to have particularly huge profit margins. So, we've established that fullsize SUVs aren't yet dead, Chevrolet and GMC are two of the biggest players in the segment and, importantly, that the market is lucrative. It was with these facts in mind that we slid behind the wheel of the 2015 Chevy Tahoe. Just who is it that are buying up these massive utilities, and what are the specific virtues that lead to their continued success? Let's find out. To our eyes, it looks more purposeful than pretty. When looking through an out-of-focus lens, just about any fullsize body-on-frame sport utility is going to appear mostly like a big box on wheels. Fortunately, Chevy has gone to great lengths to give the Tahoe a distinctive look. Whether it's an attractive vehicle, though, is certainly up for debate. To our eyes, it looks more purposeful than pretty, with a handsome profile that's a bit spoiled by the strangely shaped headlamp clusters and massive, upright chrome grille. If you don't like the look of the Tahoe, remember that there's a probably a GMC dealer close by with a sales floor full of Yukons, which we think look quite a bit prettier. The good news is that its long, straight lines and vertical stance mean its interior is large, bright and airy. Seats are comfortable, and the leather surfaces of our LTZ tester were soft and supple. In front of the driver sits a cluster with easy-to-read gauges, including a large tachometer on the left, a matching speedometer on the right and a row of four smaller ancillaries …Hide Full Review