R-Line 4dr All-wheel Drive 4MOTION
2014 Volkswagen Tiguan

MSRP ?

$38,835
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N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 20 City / 26 Hwy
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2014 Tiguan Overview

What are auto writers always asking for from global automakers? "Give us your hip European wares," we plead, "give us your diesels and your manuals and your wagons, your tauter suspensions and Welsh B-road handling, your neat matrix lighting and your funky little Hello-Kitty-sized trailer hitches to haul the little Hello-Kitty-sized caravans that we'll also need you to start exporting." How do the automakers almost always respond? At best, "We'll gauge demand." More likely, "No," because for whatever reason, "We just don't think it's right for the US market." If that's how they had answered us in the case of the Volkswagen Tiguan "Track & Style" Bluemotion TDI, they'd actually be right. Volkswagen recently brought this Euro-spec compact crossover to the US for a 'Get to know me!' tour, and while we hate to drag the cute little thing into the public square to acquaint it with the whip, well, we have no choice. See, it's just not right for the US market. We like diesels, but this one is not the way to go in the US. The problems start with the engine, a 2.0-liter, four-cylinder turbocharged, direct-injected diesel with 174 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque. That's 26 hp down and 73 lb-ft up on the Tiguan R-Line we recently drove, and the doors to all of that torque open at just 1,750 rpm. From the flywheel, it's sent to a seven-speed DSG transmission and onto the Haldex-managed 4Motion all-wheel drive. Of that R-Line model, we wrote, "That 207 lb-ft of warthog grunt comes on from 1,700 rpm, same as the 200 hp, and the six-speed transmission didn't need help knowing where to be in the rev range when called to attention," and, "the compact crossover that looks like a big shoe is a perfect hoot to drive." You'd think that with buckets more torque, a dual-clutch gearbox and another gear, the sweet experience we had in the R-Line would become diabeetus in the TDI. You'd be wrong. The engine sounds like it was sourced from a minor farm implement, as if a deal VW finally was able to strike with Fiat was to take its excess inventory of New Holland tractor motors. It's not obnoxious, but it does sound like a Latin colossus shaking out a samba with 250-pound maracas, clattering in a way that announces exactly what kind of fuel it runs on and not letting you forget until you get up to highway speeds and wind noise throws a blanket over it. We found the clatter especially strange since VW and sister brand Audi have been working so hard, so publicly, and so effectively at erasing the stigma of diesel engines with its North American TDI offerings. This engine does not do that. Then we remembered that it's not for sale here, and we were glad. We like diesels, but this one is not the way to go in the US. The transmission on occasion likes to sample several gears before it settles down …
Full Review

2014 Tiguan Overview

What are auto writers always asking for from global automakers? "Give us your hip European wares," we plead, "give us your diesels and your manuals and your wagons, your tauter suspensions and Welsh B-road handling, your neat matrix lighting and your funky little Hello-Kitty-sized trailer hitches to haul the little Hello-Kitty-sized caravans that we'll also need you to start exporting." How do the automakers almost always respond? At best, "We'll gauge demand." More likely, "No," because for whatever reason, "We just don't think it's right for the US market." If that's how they had answered us in the case of the Volkswagen Tiguan "Track & Style" Bluemotion TDI, they'd actually be right. Volkswagen recently brought this Euro-spec compact crossover to the US for a 'Get to know me!' tour, and while we hate to drag the cute little thing into the public square to acquaint it with the whip, well, we have no choice. See, it's just not right for the US market. We like diesels, but this one is not the way to go in the US. The problems start with the engine, a 2.0-liter, four-cylinder turbocharged, direct-injected diesel with 174 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque. That's 26 hp down and 73 lb-ft up on the Tiguan R-Line we recently drove, and the doors to all of that torque open at just 1,750 rpm. From the flywheel, it's sent to a seven-speed DSG transmission and onto the Haldex-managed 4Motion all-wheel drive. Of that R-Line model, we wrote, "That 207 lb-ft of warthog grunt comes on from 1,700 rpm, same as the 200 hp, and the six-speed transmission didn't need help knowing where to be in the rev range when called to attention," and, "the compact crossover that looks like a big shoe is a perfect hoot to drive." You'd think that with buckets more torque, a dual-clutch gearbox and another gear, the sweet experience we had in the R-Line would become diabeetus in the TDI. You'd be wrong. The engine sounds like it was sourced from a minor farm implement, as if a deal VW finally was able to strike with Fiat was to take its excess inventory of New Holland tractor motors. It's not obnoxious, but it does sound like a Latin colossus shaking out a samba with 250-pound maracas, clattering in a way that announces exactly what kind of fuel it runs on and not letting you forget until you get up to highway speeds and wind noise throws a blanket over it. We found the clatter especially strange since VW and sister brand Audi have been working so hard, so publicly, and so effectively at erasing the stigma of diesel engines with its North American TDI offerings. This engine does not do that. Then we remembered that it's not for sale here, and we were glad. We like diesels, but this one is not the way to go in the US. The transmission on occasion likes to sample several gears before it settles down …Hide Full Review