2014 Porsche Cayman

MSRP ?

$52,600 - $63,800
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Engine Engine 2.7LH-6
MPG MPG 20 City / 30 Hwy
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2014 Cayman Overview

Second Fiddle Moves To First Chair In the interest of full disclosure and a bit of bloodletting, allow me to admit that while I've always coveted the Porsche Boxster and its hard-hatted Cayman cousin, I've never quite warmed to them visually. They've always had a certain push-me, pull-you, can't-decide-which-way-they're-going aesthetic that's been tough to wrap my head around. Porsche achieved the same thing with the original 550 Spyder's overturned bathtub bodyshell that would come to inspire the Boxster, but somehow that classic's even more symmetrical nature works for me. Fast-forward to this third generation, and at least for this enthusiast, Porsche's manchild has well and truly come of age as a design. It's all there – a piercing stare thanks to squircle headlamps inspired by the 918 Spyder hypercar, newfound directional thrust afforded by a longer wheelbase and elongated greenhouse, and muscular rear haunches with a wider stance emphasized by larger side ductwork and snubbed overhangs. The body's teardrop shape terminates with an active spoiler that integrates into a gorgeous arc with the taillamps like a budding ducktail nod to 1973 911 Carrera RS. Despite casting a longer shadow than its predecessor, the 2014 Cayman still looks tidily proportioned, smooth and wieldy, the perfect skipping stone to ricochet down a canyon river road. The Cayman's 46/54 weight split strikes just the right balance of blade to handle. It's not all for the sake of appearances, either – this Cayman features more aluminum-intensive construction that cuts its body-in-white weight by 100 pounds, yet torsional rigidity – never really a weak spot to begin with – is up by 40 percent. Some of that weight loss has been eaten away by increases in standard equipment, but even with a 2.4-inch longer wheelbase, which now spans longer than a 911 Carrera, Porsche says this Cayman S is still a useful 66 pounds lighter than last year's model. There were things to carp about with the second-generation model – some marginal interior trimmings, usurious option prices – but handling never came up on the Cayman's report card under 'Needs Improvement.' Even so, the stiffer chassis and larger footprint sets the table for better handling and stability. Enthusiasts regularly blather on about the perfection of 50/50 weight distribution, but for my money, a little more junk in the trunk of a rear-wheel drive performance car isn't a bad way to go, particularly when you have to add occupants' weight into the equation ahead of the engine. The Cayman's 46/54 weight split strikes just the right balance of blade to handle, and there are bagfuls of grip – the rear end may be the pendulum, but with our car's optional Pirelli P-Zero rubber, it takes a strong cocktail of bravado and stupidity to get the rear end well and truly unhinged, especially if stability control is in place. The rear end is as painlessly catch and release as an overstocked and underfed pond. Brainstem-straining traction is great, but there's a lot more fun to be had …
Full Review

2014 Cayman Overview

Second Fiddle Moves To First Chair In the interest of full disclosure and a bit of bloodletting, allow me to admit that while I've always coveted the Porsche Boxster and its hard-hatted Cayman cousin, I've never quite warmed to them visually. They've always had a certain push-me, pull-you, can't-decide-which-way-they're-going aesthetic that's been tough to wrap my head around. Porsche achieved the same thing with the original 550 Spyder's overturned bathtub bodyshell that would come to inspire the Boxster, but somehow that classic's even more symmetrical nature works for me. Fast-forward to this third generation, and at least for this enthusiast, Porsche's manchild has well and truly come of age as a design. It's all there – a piercing stare thanks to squircle headlamps inspired by the 918 Spyder hypercar, newfound directional thrust afforded by a longer wheelbase and elongated greenhouse, and muscular rear haunches with a wider stance emphasized by larger side ductwork and snubbed overhangs. The body's teardrop shape terminates with an active spoiler that integrates into a gorgeous arc with the taillamps like a budding ducktail nod to 1973 911 Carrera RS. Despite casting a longer shadow than its predecessor, the 2014 Cayman still looks tidily proportioned, smooth and wieldy, the perfect skipping stone to ricochet down a canyon river road. The Cayman's 46/54 weight split strikes just the right balance of blade to handle. It's not all for the sake of appearances, either – this Cayman features more aluminum-intensive construction that cuts its body-in-white weight by 100 pounds, yet torsional rigidity – never really a weak spot to begin with – is up by 40 percent. Some of that weight loss has been eaten away by increases in standard equipment, but even with a 2.4-inch longer wheelbase, which now spans longer than a 911 Carrera, Porsche says this Cayman S is still a useful 66 pounds lighter than last year's model. There were things to carp about with the second-generation model – some marginal interior trimmings, usurious option prices – but handling never came up on the Cayman's report card under 'Needs Improvement.' Even so, the stiffer chassis and larger footprint sets the table for better handling and stability. Enthusiasts regularly blather on about the perfection of 50/50 weight distribution, but for my money, a little more junk in the trunk of a rear-wheel drive performance car isn't a bad way to go, particularly when you have to add occupants' weight into the equation ahead of the engine. The Cayman's 46/54 weight split strikes just the right balance of blade to handle, and there are bagfuls of grip – the rear end may be the pendulum, but with our car's optional Pirelli P-Zero rubber, it takes a strong cocktail of bravado and stupidity to get the rear end well and truly unhinged, especially if stability control is in place. The rear end is as painlessly catch and release as an overstocked and underfed pond. Brainstem-straining traction is great, but there's a lot more fun to be had …Hide Full Review