S Plus 4dr Hatchback
2014 Nissan Versa Note

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$15,240
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Engine Engine 1.6LI-4
MPG MPG 31 City / 40 Hwy
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2014 Versa Note Overview

Incredible Value Has Trouble Winning Hearts How important is vehicle sticker price? How imperative is fuel economy? What about passenger room and technology? Nissan is hoping that consumers find all four objective measurements significant, because the all-new 2014 Versa Note excels in each of those areas. Not only does the five-door deliver the most competitive pricing, but it provides best-in-class combined fuel economy and best-in-class total interior volume. And the new model offers a full range of innovative technology, including available navigation and the automaker's impressive Around-View monitor to ease parking. But how crucial are the model's more subjective traits – qualities like driver and passenger comfort, usable cargo space and driving dynamics? Can a new subcompact remain competitive if it doesn't perform equally as well in those categories? Nissan pulled the covers off its new Versa Note at the Detroit Auto Show earlier this year. The five-door replaces the Versa Hatchback to sit side-by-side with the Versa Sedan in Nissan showrooms (deliveries started in mid-June). Compared to the Versa Sedan, the Note rides on an identical 102.4-inch wheelbase, but the new model is nearly a full foot shorter than its four-door sibling. The Note and Sedan are equal in width, but the Note is slightly taller. The curb weight of the Note, with a continuously variable transmission, is only 2,460 pounds – that's about the same as the sedan, yet some 300 pounds lighter than the discontinued hatchback. The curb weight of the Note is only 2,460 pounds, some 300 pounds lighter than the discontinued hatchback. In terms of styling, the Note is a leap forward compared to the outgoing hatchback. It has a sharply raked windshield that helps pull off its clean and aerodynamic shape (Nissan is quick to point out its "squash" character line and Juke- and 370Z-inspired tail lights). Hatchbacks aren't the slipperiest shapes when moving through the wind, but the automaker has gone to great lengths to pare down the Note's drag. The mirrors have been moved off the A-pillars and a large front splitter and tire deflector help keep air from beneath the vehicle. Even the fuel tank and rear suspension beams have been engineered flush with aerodynamics in mind. Lastly, active grill shutters close tight to limit unnecessary airflow into the engine compartment. Nissan boasts that the Note earns a drag coefficient of 0.298 on CVT models. (However, a bit of research reveals that the shape of the Versa sedan is still slightly more efficient at 0.288 in the S Plus CVT, SV and SL models.) All Note models are front-wheel drive, sharing the same 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine as the Versa Sedan. The all-aluminum engine (internal code HR16DE) is rated at 109 horsepower and 107 pound-feet of torque, and it has a redline of 6,500 rpm. The standard transmission is a five-speed manual, but it is only offered in the base model, while all other trims are fitted with Nissan's next-generation Xtronic CVT. The entry-level model, known as the Note S, starts at …
Full Review

2014 Versa Note Overview

Incredible Value Has Trouble Winning Hearts How important is vehicle sticker price? How imperative is fuel economy? What about passenger room and technology? Nissan is hoping that consumers find all four objective measurements significant, because the all-new 2014 Versa Note excels in each of those areas. Not only does the five-door deliver the most competitive pricing, but it provides best-in-class combined fuel economy and best-in-class total interior volume. And the new model offers a full range of innovative technology, including available navigation and the automaker's impressive Around-View monitor to ease parking. But how crucial are the model's more subjective traits – qualities like driver and passenger comfort, usable cargo space and driving dynamics? Can a new subcompact remain competitive if it doesn't perform equally as well in those categories? Nissan pulled the covers off its new Versa Note at the Detroit Auto Show earlier this year. The five-door replaces the Versa Hatchback to sit side-by-side with the Versa Sedan in Nissan showrooms (deliveries started in mid-June). Compared to the Versa Sedan, the Note rides on an identical 102.4-inch wheelbase, but the new model is nearly a full foot shorter than its four-door sibling. The Note and Sedan are equal in width, but the Note is slightly taller. The curb weight of the Note, with a continuously variable transmission, is only 2,460 pounds – that's about the same as the sedan, yet some 300 pounds lighter than the discontinued hatchback. The curb weight of the Note is only 2,460 pounds, some 300 pounds lighter than the discontinued hatchback. In terms of styling, the Note is a leap forward compared to the outgoing hatchback. It has a sharply raked windshield that helps pull off its clean and aerodynamic shape (Nissan is quick to point out its "squash" character line and Juke- and 370Z-inspired tail lights). Hatchbacks aren't the slipperiest shapes when moving through the wind, but the automaker has gone to great lengths to pare down the Note's drag. The mirrors have been moved off the A-pillars and a large front splitter and tire deflector help keep air from beneath the vehicle. Even the fuel tank and rear suspension beams have been engineered flush with aerodynamics in mind. Lastly, active grill shutters close tight to limit unnecessary airflow into the engine compartment. Nissan boasts that the Note earns a drag coefficient of 0.298 on CVT models. (However, a bit of research reveals that the shape of the Versa sedan is still slightly more efficient at 0.288 in the S Plus CVT, SV and SL models.) All Note models are front-wheel drive, sharing the same 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine as the Versa Sedan. The all-aluminum engine (internal code HR16DE) is rated at 109 horsepower and 107 pound-feet of torque, and it has a redline of 6,500 rpm. The standard transmission is a five-speed manual, but it is only offered in the base model, while all other trims are fitted with Nissan's next-generation Xtronic CVT. The entry-level model, known as the Note S, starts at …Hide Full Review