2014 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter

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Engine Engine 2.1LI-4
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2014 Sprinter Overview

Ready To Battle Others Of Its Own Kind To the casual van observer, there are likely three seminal categories of big-box hauler. 1) The white Ford Econoline. 2) The decades-old conversion vans made by various manufacturers, with a porthole, an angel and a unicorn floating in an airbrushed rendition of the cosmos. 3) The European van, up until recently embodied solely in the form of the Mercedes-Benz (or Dodge or Freightliner) Sprinter. It's the latter we flew to Germany to drive, the 2014 model year adding a new standard engine and transmission, new safety tech and a finespun redesign. The fresh elements aren't just to give buyers a reason to go brand-new, though. With the Nissan "Proboscis Monkey" NV200 having already arrived, Ford about to import its larger Transit cargo hauler and the Fiat Ducato ready to become the Ram ProMaster, the European van that started it all needs to prepare for new competition that actually aligns with its feature set. If anyone has issues with the 2014 Sprinter, they shouldn't have anything to do with its performance... The biggest change lives right under the Benz's short nose: a 2.1-liter, four-cylinder diesel engine mated to a seven-speed automatic transmission has become the Sprinter's standard engine. Up until now, the Sprinter has only offered a Hobson's choice of motors, that being a 3.0-liter, six-cylinder diesel paired with a five-speed automatic. The six-cylinder and its automatic partner stay, maintaining the same numbers – 188 horsepower and 325 pound-feet of torque. But when the new van goes on sale on September 1, they will migrate to the option sheet. A 2.1-liter, four-cylinder diesel engine mated to a seven-speed automatic transmission has become the Sprinter's standard engine. The common-rail, direct-injected, four-cylinder diesel with a two-stage turbocharger slides into the base-model spot with 161 hp and 265 lb-ft. In US trim, that twist comes on as low as 1,400 rpm. That's 7 horsepower and 22 pound-feet more than the inline five-cylinder that was the sole engine choice for most of the Sprinter's time here (before the 3.0-liter six arrived) – a powerplant buyers liked enough to give the Sprinter a toehold in our market. The seven-speed transmission is fitted with a torque converter in order to keep a plush edge on gearchanges. The curb weight of the Sprinter panel vans vary with configuration, but this engine and transmission will be the go-to combination even for models that break the five-ton GVWR barrier. That makes the torque converter a kind consideration since no one should be surprised that an engine with such modest thrust must employ every available ratio to find the most efficient way forward. Gains in efficiency have been eked from other points in the drivetrain, including a remap of the generator management system, a power steering pump that operates on the hydraulic steering only when needed and a more precise fuel pump. Even the profiles of the teeth in the rear axle's differential and the oil flow around them – improved so as …
Full Review

2014 Sprinter Overview

Ready To Battle Others Of Its Own Kind To the casual van observer, there are likely three seminal categories of big-box hauler. 1) The white Ford Econoline. 2) The decades-old conversion vans made by various manufacturers, with a porthole, an angel and a unicorn floating in an airbrushed rendition of the cosmos. 3) The European van, up until recently embodied solely in the form of the Mercedes-Benz (or Dodge or Freightliner) Sprinter. It's the latter we flew to Germany to drive, the 2014 model year adding a new standard engine and transmission, new safety tech and a finespun redesign. The fresh elements aren't just to give buyers a reason to go brand-new, though. With the Nissan "Proboscis Monkey" NV200 having already arrived, Ford about to import its larger Transit cargo hauler and the Fiat Ducato ready to become the Ram ProMaster, the European van that started it all needs to prepare for new competition that actually aligns with its feature set. If anyone has issues with the 2014 Sprinter, they shouldn't have anything to do with its performance... The biggest change lives right under the Benz's short nose: a 2.1-liter, four-cylinder diesel engine mated to a seven-speed automatic transmission has become the Sprinter's standard engine. Up until now, the Sprinter has only offered a Hobson's choice of motors, that being a 3.0-liter, six-cylinder diesel paired with a five-speed automatic. The six-cylinder and its automatic partner stay, maintaining the same numbers – 188 horsepower and 325 pound-feet of torque. But when the new van goes on sale on September 1, they will migrate to the option sheet. A 2.1-liter, four-cylinder diesel engine mated to a seven-speed automatic transmission has become the Sprinter's standard engine. The common-rail, direct-injected, four-cylinder diesel with a two-stage turbocharger slides into the base-model spot with 161 hp and 265 lb-ft. In US trim, that twist comes on as low as 1,400 rpm. That's 7 horsepower and 22 pound-feet more than the inline five-cylinder that was the sole engine choice for most of the Sprinter's time here (before the 3.0-liter six arrived) – a powerplant buyers liked enough to give the Sprinter a toehold in our market. The seven-speed transmission is fitted with a torque converter in order to keep a plush edge on gearchanges. The curb weight of the Sprinter panel vans vary with configuration, but this engine and transmission will be the go-to combination even for models that break the five-ton GVWR barrier. That makes the torque converter a kind consideration since no one should be surprised that an engine with such modest thrust must employ every available ratio to find the most efficient way forward. Gains in efficiency have been eked from other points in the drivetrain, including a remap of the generator management system, a power steering pump that operates on the hydraulic steering only when needed and a more precise fuel pump. Even the profiles of the teeth in the rear axle's differential and the oil flow around them – improved so as …Hide Full Review