Ultimate 4dr Rear-wheel Drive Sedan
2014 Hyundai Equus

MSRP ?

$68,500
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 5.0LV-8
MPG MPG 15 City / 23 Hwy
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2014 Equus Overview

A Lesson In How To Out-Lexus The LS I think that the new BMW 4 Series is an attractive coupe. The design is a little bit on the wrong side of "fussy" I'll grant you, and I don't particularly care for the look of the scalloped, black-bordered vents on the fender sides – functional though they may be. But for the most part, I find the coupe to be pretty pleasing to look at. You all, by and large, do not care for the 4 Series. (For the sake of constructing my intellectual argument, I'm going to make the ridiculous statistical assumption that the 140 or so comments on our 4 Series First Drive provide a representative opinion of our readership as a whole.) In the first 24 hours after we published our review of the car, you felt moved to comment that it was "ugly," "REALLY ugly" and "a disappointment" among other, less reprintable statements of ardor. So clearly we see things a little differently in terms of styling, but what does any of this have to do with the 2014 Hyundai Equus? In most segments of the auto industry, there are a lot of practical reasons to buy or not buy a car. The fullsize luxury segment, however, would seem to live outside the realm of practicality insofar as almost all of the functions of these cars can be duplicated by non-premium offerings, and for a lot less money. Fullsize luxury cars sell, or do not, based on how they make a driver feel and the image they convey to the outside world. By necessity, a lot of that is tied up in how they look. To my eye, each competitor has finer exterior styling than the Equus. I would struggle to call any of the luxury set that competes with the Equus truly beautiful, though almost all of them convey a sense of gravitas and richness. For the record, Hyundai counts the Lexus LS and the Mercedes-Benz S-Class as the primary competition, and the Audi A8, BMW 7 Series and Cadillac XTS as the secondary set. In that group, some of the cars are pretty bold, pretty striking, though none of them is lovely. Still, to my eye, each competitor has finer exterior styling than the Equus, whose model-year 2014 refresh leaves it still looking rather anonymous. The grille of the Equus has been denuded of some of the 2013 model's chrome accents, but it lacks the forceful demeanor I expect of a big, opulent sedan. The rear of the car is a sort of high-waisted, forgettable rectangle, while the profile view's most commendable feature are the new 19-inch turbine-style wheels. Of course, we've established that you and I, dear reader, don't always see eye to eye on matters of style. It's possible that my 4 Series-loving peepers simply can't suss out the beauty in the Equus that is apparent to others. So be it. There's a lot less Hyundai and a lot more Equus in the …
Full Review

2014 Equus Overview

A Lesson In How To Out-Lexus The LS I think that the new BMW 4 Series is an attractive coupe. The design is a little bit on the wrong side of "fussy" I'll grant you, and I don't particularly care for the look of the scalloped, black-bordered vents on the fender sides – functional though they may be. But for the most part, I find the coupe to be pretty pleasing to look at. You all, by and large, do not care for the 4 Series. (For the sake of constructing my intellectual argument, I'm going to make the ridiculous statistical assumption that the 140 or so comments on our 4 Series First Drive provide a representative opinion of our readership as a whole.) In the first 24 hours after we published our review of the car, you felt moved to comment that it was "ugly," "REALLY ugly" and "a disappointment" among other, less reprintable statements of ardor. So clearly we see things a little differently in terms of styling, but what does any of this have to do with the 2014 Hyundai Equus? In most segments of the auto industry, there are a lot of practical reasons to buy or not buy a car. The fullsize luxury segment, however, would seem to live outside the realm of practicality insofar as almost all of the functions of these cars can be duplicated by non-premium offerings, and for a lot less money. Fullsize luxury cars sell, or do not, based on how they make a driver feel and the image they convey to the outside world. By necessity, a lot of that is tied up in how they look. To my eye, each competitor has finer exterior styling than the Equus. I would struggle to call any of the luxury set that competes with the Equus truly beautiful, though almost all of them convey a sense of gravitas and richness. For the record, Hyundai counts the Lexus LS and the Mercedes-Benz S-Class as the primary competition, and the Audi A8, BMW 7 Series and Cadillac XTS as the secondary set. In that group, some of the cars are pretty bold, pretty striking, though none of them is lovely. Still, to my eye, each competitor has finer exterior styling than the Equus, whose model-year 2014 refresh leaves it still looking rather anonymous. The grille of the Equus has been denuded of some of the 2013 model's chrome accents, but it lacks the forceful demeanor I expect of a big, opulent sedan. The rear of the car is a sort of high-waisted, forgettable rectangle, while the profile view's most commendable feature are the new 19-inch turbine-style wheels. Of course, we've established that you and I, dear reader, don't always see eye to eye on matters of style. It's possible that my 4 Series-loving peepers simply can't suss out the beauty in the Equus that is apparent to others. So be it. There's a lot less Hyundai and a lot more Equus in the …Hide Full Review