2014 Aston Martin Vanquish

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$279,995 - $296,295
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Engine Engine 6.0LV-12
MPG MPG 13 City / 19 Hwy
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2014 Vanquish Overview

A Carbon-Fiber Successor To The Flagship DBS A terrible wave of sadness engulfed me from the driver's seat of the Aston Martin as its speedometer needle crept towards 130 miles per hour. My anguish only grew as the upcoming corner filled the windscreen. As my right foot pressed firmly against the aluminum brake pedal, I began to feel pity for the affluent owners of the all-new 2014 Vanquish who will never have the opportunity to wring their very capable super GT sports cars on a racing circuit. Exiting the turn, the 6.0-liter V12 roared to life and I snapped back to reality - any trace of mourning quickly disappeared. It is not anyone's role to decide how an Aston owner treats his or her motorized piece of art. Whether the aluminum and carbon-fiber machines spend their useful life serving as transportation for British royalty, stuck in LA Basin traffic at the hands of well-heeled CEOs or as the latest getaway car in a Bond film, short of writing the big check our judgment ends at the daydream. But fantasy is reality in the world of automotive journalism, and this is why I am at NOLA Motorsports Park outside New Orleans running a $300,000 vehicle at speed. After a five-year absence, the Vanquish has been revived. Yet its arrival, as a 2014 model, spells the end for the DBS, as the fresh new coupe will replace the outgoing vehicle as Aston Martin's new halo car (simultaneously, the Virage has also been quietly dropped from the lineup after a short two-year run). The brakes are carbon-ceramic discs with six-piston calipers shared with the One-77 supercar. Like all late-model Astons (with the exception of the Toyota-based Cygnet), the new Vanquish starts with an all-aluminum monocoque chassis that the automaker calls its "Generation 4 VH" platform – it has been upgraded several times over the past decade. Affixed to the lightweight, but extremely rigid, framework is an aluminum, magnesium alloy and composite body (every single body panel is now carbon-fiber). Compared to its DBS predecessor, Aston Martin claims the new structure is lighter and 25-percent more rigid. Furthermore, a full 75 percent of the parts are new. The structure serves as an excellent platform for the adaptive independent suspension. Both the front and rear of the chassis is suspended with double-wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bars and three-stage monotube dampers (the driver selects between Normal, Sport and Track modes from the cabin). The brakes are carbon-ceramic discs with six-piston calipers (over 15.7 x 1.4-inch rotors) shared with the automaker's One-77 supercar in the front and four-piston calipers (over 14.2 x 1.3-inch rotors) in the rear. The lightweight 20-inch alloy wheels are wrapped in next-generation Pirelli P-Zero tires in staggered front and rear sizes (255/35ZR20 and 305/30ZR20, respectively), while the steering is speed-dependent, rack-and-pinion with hydraulic power assistance. Hand-assembled at the automaker's dedicated engine plant in Cologne, Germany, is Aston Martin's familiar 6.0-liter V12 engine. For its new role, the powerplant has been upgraded with dual …
Full Review

2014 Vanquish Overview

A Carbon-Fiber Successor To The Flagship DBS A terrible wave of sadness engulfed me from the driver's seat of the Aston Martin as its speedometer needle crept towards 130 miles per hour. My anguish only grew as the upcoming corner filled the windscreen. As my right foot pressed firmly against the aluminum brake pedal, I began to feel pity for the affluent owners of the all-new 2014 Vanquish who will never have the opportunity to wring their very capable super GT sports cars on a racing circuit. Exiting the turn, the 6.0-liter V12 roared to life and I snapped back to reality - any trace of mourning quickly disappeared. It is not anyone's role to decide how an Aston owner treats his or her motorized piece of art. Whether the aluminum and carbon-fiber machines spend their useful life serving as transportation for British royalty, stuck in LA Basin traffic at the hands of well-heeled CEOs or as the latest getaway car in a Bond film, short of writing the big check our judgment ends at the daydream. But fantasy is reality in the world of automotive journalism, and this is why I am at NOLA Motorsports Park outside New Orleans running a $300,000 vehicle at speed. After a five-year absence, the Vanquish has been revived. Yet its arrival, as a 2014 model, spells the end for the DBS, as the fresh new coupe will replace the outgoing vehicle as Aston Martin's new halo car (simultaneously, the Virage has also been quietly dropped from the lineup after a short two-year run). The brakes are carbon-ceramic discs with six-piston calipers shared with the One-77 supercar. Like all late-model Astons (with the exception of the Toyota-based Cygnet), the new Vanquish starts with an all-aluminum monocoque chassis that the automaker calls its "Generation 4 VH" platform – it has been upgraded several times over the past decade. Affixed to the lightweight, but extremely rigid, framework is an aluminum, magnesium alloy and composite body (every single body panel is now carbon-fiber). Compared to its DBS predecessor, Aston Martin claims the new structure is lighter and 25-percent more rigid. Furthermore, a full 75 percent of the parts are new. The structure serves as an excellent platform for the adaptive independent suspension. Both the front and rear of the chassis is suspended with double-wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bars and three-stage monotube dampers (the driver selects between Normal, Sport and Track modes from the cabin). The brakes are carbon-ceramic discs with six-piston calipers (over 15.7 x 1.4-inch rotors) shared with the automaker's One-77 supercar in the front and four-piston calipers (over 14.2 x 1.3-inch rotors) in the rear. The lightweight 20-inch alloy wheels are wrapped in next-generation Pirelli P-Zero tires in staggered front and rear sizes (255/35ZR20 and 305/30ZR20, respectively), while the steering is speed-dependent, rack-and-pinion with hydraulic power assistance. Hand-assembled at the automaker's dedicated engine plant in Cologne, Germany, is Aston Martin's familiar 6.0-liter V12 engine. For its new role, the powerplant has been upgraded with dual …Hide Full Review