LE 4dr Front-wheel Drive
2013 Toyota RAV4

MSRP ?

$23,300
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Engine Engine 2.5LI-4
MPG MPG 24 City / 31 Hwy
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2013 RAV4 Overview

Tesla-Hearted Toyota Offers Real Sport And Utility The 2012 Toyota RAV4 EV is the most advanced Alpha prototype electric vehicle we've ever driven. Or maybe it's a poster child for the 21st Century automotive industry where all sorts of new things are being tried, like when old-school automakers and ambitious start-ups find common purpose in rushing an all-electric crossover to market in two years. Or maybe it's the end result of a decade-long process of getting the Japanese automaker to bring back its popular – by EV standards, anyway – first-gen RAV4 EV for the new era of electric cars? It is, of course, all of these things, and that's what makes the RAV4 EV such an interesting vehicle: It not only offers surprisingly good performance on the road, it can also tell you some compelling stories as you jump from 0-60 in seven seconds. In a CUV. With an easy-to-achieve 100-mile range. Most compelling, perhaps, is that the RAV4 EV is a real electric crossover with a real on-sale date. Namely, $49,800 (before any tax credits) and late summer 2012. Of course, the problem, aside from the hefty price, is that this CUV will only be available – initially, anyway – in four major California markets: Sacramento, San Francisco Bay Area, San Diego and Los Angeles/Orange County. Since the RAV4 EV will go on sale in The OC (don't call it that), it made sense that Toyota brought journalists to Newport Beach for some time behind the wheel. If you're not interested in the technical details or the three story lines we saw represented, here's all you need to know. When we first put the RAV4 EV into Sport driving mode, our honest reaction was to say out loud: "Holy crap!" The second-generation RAV4 EV isn't really the second-generation at all. Toyota stopped making the original RAV4 EV in 2003 and there hasn't been much work done (publicly, at least) since then. In fact, it is unlikely that the 2012 version would have come to pass had Akio Toyoda, the president and CEO of Toyota Motor Corporation, and Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk not announced in May 2010 that they would work together on electric vehicles, with the RAV4 EV being named as the candidate vehicle in July. "People love SUVs and their current moral dilemma is the need for occasional versatility at the expense of everyday fuel economy." As we noted in our Quick Spin of an early RAV4 EV prototype last year, the project is a rush job. We saw the first prototype at the LA Auto Show in November and the first demonstration program vehicles were on the road in February 2011. The frenetic pace doesn't mean that Toyota was first to bring an EV to the current market, just that the company was very clearly not interested in waiting any longer to offer something without a tailpipe. It also happens to be an EV unlike anything else on the market. As Greg Bernas, chief engineer …
Full Review

2013 RAV4 Overview

Tesla-Hearted Toyota Offers Real Sport And Utility The 2012 Toyota RAV4 EV is the most advanced Alpha prototype electric vehicle we've ever driven. Or maybe it's a poster child for the 21st Century automotive industry where all sorts of new things are being tried, like when old-school automakers and ambitious start-ups find common purpose in rushing an all-electric crossover to market in two years. Or maybe it's the end result of a decade-long process of getting the Japanese automaker to bring back its popular – by EV standards, anyway – first-gen RAV4 EV for the new era of electric cars? It is, of course, all of these things, and that's what makes the RAV4 EV such an interesting vehicle: It not only offers surprisingly good performance on the road, it can also tell you some compelling stories as you jump from 0-60 in seven seconds. In a CUV. With an easy-to-achieve 100-mile range. Most compelling, perhaps, is that the RAV4 EV is a real electric crossover with a real on-sale date. Namely, $49,800 (before any tax credits) and late summer 2012. Of course, the problem, aside from the hefty price, is that this CUV will only be available – initially, anyway – in four major California markets: Sacramento, San Francisco Bay Area, San Diego and Los Angeles/Orange County. Since the RAV4 EV will go on sale in The OC (don't call it that), it made sense that Toyota brought journalists to Newport Beach for some time behind the wheel. If you're not interested in the technical details or the three story lines we saw represented, here's all you need to know. When we first put the RAV4 EV into Sport driving mode, our honest reaction was to say out loud: "Holy crap!" The second-generation RAV4 EV isn't really the second-generation at all. Toyota stopped making the original RAV4 EV in 2003 and there hasn't been much work done (publicly, at least) since then. In fact, it is unlikely that the 2012 version would have come to pass had Akio Toyoda, the president and CEO of Toyota Motor Corporation, and Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk not announced in May 2010 that they would work together on electric vehicles, with the RAV4 EV being named as the candidate vehicle in July. "People love SUVs and their current moral dilemma is the need for occasional versatility at the expense of everyday fuel economy." As we noted in our Quick Spin of an early RAV4 EV prototype last year, the project is a rush job. We saw the first prototype at the LA Auto Show in November and the first demonstration program vehicles were on the road in February 2011. The frenetic pace doesn't mean that Toyota was first to bring an EV to the current market, just that the company was very clearly not interested in waiting any longer to offer something without a tailpipe. It also happens to be an EV unlike anything else on the market. As Greg Bernas, chief engineer …Hide Full Review