2013 Ferrari FF

MSRP ?

$295,000 - $295,000
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Engine Engine 6.3LV-12
MPG MPG 11 City / 16 Hwy
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2013 FF Overview

The World's Fastest Four-Passenger is Frickin' Fabulous "I miss my mommy." Those frightened words floated from the mouth of a five-year-old boy strapped snugly into a booster seat in the backseat of the Ferrari FF I was piloting. Moments earlier, his father had allowed me to take him, and his two brothers, for their first ride in a supercar, and I had apparently failed miserably. I craned my neck and moved slightly to the right, in an attempt to see him in the rearview mirror, before I asked with a cautionary tone, "What did you just say?" My mind raced during the next few seconds of silence. I wondered if I had unnecessarily traumatized him, or worse – given the little guy his first case of whiplash. I knew this 651-horsepower Italian was going to get me into trouble. It has impressive stage presence, and as a sculpture, must be grasped face-to-face. Ferrari pulled the sheets off its FF ("Ferrari Four") at the Geneva Motor Show in 2011. Unlike its predecessor, the 612 Scaglietti, the all-new FF broke significant ground in several areas. First was its new 'shooting-brake' styling – think of it as a two-door wagon – penned by Pininfarina. The unique shape allows two adults to sit comfortably in the second row and bring their luggage in the spacious trunk. Second was its hand-assembled 6.3-liter V12, the largest-capacity engine Ferrari had ever introduced for a street-legal road car. Lastly, and after more than six decades of Ferrari building rear-wheel-drive cars, the FF boasted the automaker's first all-wheel-drive system. Autoblog drove the FF for the first time in northeastern Italy nearly two years ago, when European Editor Matt Davis had the pleasure of tossing Ferrari's newest through the challenging Dolomite Mountains at the vehicle's launch. This time, I was offered the chance to spend several days with the four-passenger Italian in Southern California, where I had the opportunity to run it on very familiar turf. Images and videos don't do the FF justice; it has impressive stage presence, and as a sculpture, it must be grasped face-to-face. In person, it is much larger than most expect, and its length is surprising. As chance would have it, the Ferrari arrived a couple hours before a Bentley Continental GT Speed Le Mans was picked up. Side-by-side, the FF was visibly longer, wider and shorter in height than its British competitor. The Italian's packaging dictated a long nose for the mighty V12, and a visibly stretched wheelbase to ensure passenger comfort (the Bentley rides on a wheelbase that is a full eight inches shorter). The cabin appointments are nothing short of upper deck First Class. Speaking of occupants, the FF will encapsulate four adults without any having even the slightest feeling of being cramped. Front passengers enjoy wonderful, power-operated, heated and cooled buckets, while those in the back drop into form-fitting seats that may also be folded to increase rear cargo space. Aft of the second row is a real cargo area, …
Full Review

2013 FF Overview

The World's Fastest Four-Passenger is Frickin' Fabulous "I miss my mommy." Those frightened words floated from the mouth of a five-year-old boy strapped snugly into a booster seat in the backseat of the Ferrari FF I was piloting. Moments earlier, his father had allowed me to take him, and his two brothers, for their first ride in a supercar, and I had apparently failed miserably. I craned my neck and moved slightly to the right, in an attempt to see him in the rearview mirror, before I asked with a cautionary tone, "What did you just say?" My mind raced during the next few seconds of silence. I wondered if I had unnecessarily traumatized him, or worse – given the little guy his first case of whiplash. I knew this 651-horsepower Italian was going to get me into trouble. It has impressive stage presence, and as a sculpture, must be grasped face-to-face. Ferrari pulled the sheets off its FF ("Ferrari Four") at the Geneva Motor Show in 2011. Unlike its predecessor, the 612 Scaglietti, the all-new FF broke significant ground in several areas. First was its new 'shooting-brake' styling – think of it as a two-door wagon – penned by Pininfarina. The unique shape allows two adults to sit comfortably in the second row and bring their luggage in the spacious trunk. Second was its hand-assembled 6.3-liter V12, the largest-capacity engine Ferrari had ever introduced for a street-legal road car. Lastly, and after more than six decades of Ferrari building rear-wheel-drive cars, the FF boasted the automaker's first all-wheel-drive system. Autoblog drove the FF for the first time in northeastern Italy nearly two years ago, when European Editor Matt Davis had the pleasure of tossing Ferrari's newest through the challenging Dolomite Mountains at the vehicle's launch. This time, I was offered the chance to spend several days with the four-passenger Italian in Southern California, where I had the opportunity to run it on very familiar turf. Images and videos don't do the FF justice; it has impressive stage presence, and as a sculpture, it must be grasped face-to-face. In person, it is much larger than most expect, and its length is surprising. As chance would have it, the Ferrari arrived a couple hours before a Bentley Continental GT Speed Le Mans was picked up. Side-by-side, the FF was visibly longer, wider and shorter in height than its British competitor. The Italian's packaging dictated a long nose for the mighty V12, and a visibly stretched wheelbase to ensure passenger comfort (the Bentley rides on a wheelbase that is a full eight inches shorter). The cabin appointments are nothing short of upper deck First Class. Speaking of occupants, the FF will encapsulate four adults without any having even the slightest feeling of being cramped. Front passengers enjoy wonderful, power-operated, heated and cooled buckets, while those in the back drop into form-fitting seats that may also be folded to increase rear cargo space. Aft of the second row is a real cargo area, …Hide Full Review