GTS 2dr Coupe
2013 Dodge SRT Viper

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$120,395
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Engine Engine 8.4LV-10
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2013 SRT Viper Overview

An Extraordinary Effort to Break Previous Stereotypes The Viper has always scared the hell out of me. My aversion to the famed American sports car has nothing to do with its immensely powerful ten-cylinder engine or its Matchbox-like styling - those attributes are genuinely captivating. Instead, I have found little to like in a vehicle that is brash, coarse, uncivilized and untrustworthy at the limit. Rather than unload a slew of bitter complaints directed at each of its previous four generations, let's just say that the Viper has always represented the automotive equivalent of barbarous mechanical mayhem. That is, until now. After a three-year absence, an all-new Viper debuted at the 2012 New York Auto Show. No longer under the Dodge umbrella, Chrysler's supercar returned wearing the new performance-oriented SRT (Street and Racing Technology) brand label. Despite its familiar shape and engine configuration, the completely redesigned coupe promised not only more power but better handling, superior craftsmanship, innovative technology and a world-class cabin. While this may sound as if the automaker's halo two-seater has been tamed after being forced through politically correct manners and etiquette classes, my observation - after spending a couple days with the snake on public roads and at Sonoma Raceway - is that the iconic Viper may be much more refined and less temperamental, but it still has some of the longest and sharpest fangs in the segment. The original 1992 Dodge Viper RT/10 Roadster was one outrageous street car. Available only in red, each of the 285 copies was fitted with a truck-sourced 8.0-liter V10 engine developing 400 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque. While raw performance was impressive at the time (0-60 in 4.6 seconds and a top speed of about 165 mph), the two-seater was about as domesticated as Paleolithic man. It not only lacked a roof, but windows and air conditioning too. The old Viper was unfriendly to the uninitiated, uncomfortable on the road and very difficult to drive at the limit. As the rest of the industry was embracing anti-lock brakes (ABS) and electronic stability control (ESC), the Viper seemed to shun anything that would have resulted in even mild domestication. Four generations of Dodge Viper would eventually be built (through July of 2010), Unfortunately, years of evolutionary changes improved performance but did little to tame its natural callousness – the old Viper was fast, but unfriendly to the uninitiated, uncomfortable on the road and very difficult to drive at the limit. Chrysler finally ceased production of its flagship in July of 2010, with the promise of a new super sports car diligently in the works. Lighter materials have cut about 100 pounds off the weight off the new chassis. Despite the three-year gap, the 2013 SRT Viper isn't an entirely clean-sheet design. Carried forward from its predecessor is its basic backbone tubular steel space frame, but it has been significantly upgraded with a sturdy-but-lightweight cast magnesium firewall and countless other tweaks including a new aluminum x-brace under the hood (overall, …
Full Review

2013 SRT Viper Overview

An Extraordinary Effort to Break Previous Stereotypes The Viper has always scared the hell out of me. My aversion to the famed American sports car has nothing to do with its immensely powerful ten-cylinder engine or its Matchbox-like styling - those attributes are genuinely captivating. Instead, I have found little to like in a vehicle that is brash, coarse, uncivilized and untrustworthy at the limit. Rather than unload a slew of bitter complaints directed at each of its previous four generations, let's just say that the Viper has always represented the automotive equivalent of barbarous mechanical mayhem. That is, until now. After a three-year absence, an all-new Viper debuted at the 2012 New York Auto Show. No longer under the Dodge umbrella, Chrysler's supercar returned wearing the new performance-oriented SRT (Street and Racing Technology) brand label. Despite its familiar shape and engine configuration, the completely redesigned coupe promised not only more power but better handling, superior craftsmanship, innovative technology and a world-class cabin. While this may sound as if the automaker's halo two-seater has been tamed after being forced through politically correct manners and etiquette classes, my observation - after spending a couple days with the snake on public roads and at Sonoma Raceway - is that the iconic Viper may be much more refined and less temperamental, but it still has some of the longest and sharpest fangs in the segment. The original 1992 Dodge Viper RT/10 Roadster was one outrageous street car. Available only in red, each of the 285 copies was fitted with a truck-sourced 8.0-liter V10 engine developing 400 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque. While raw performance was impressive at the time (0-60 in 4.6 seconds and a top speed of about 165 mph), the two-seater was about as domesticated as Paleolithic man. It not only lacked a roof, but windows and air conditioning too. The old Viper was unfriendly to the uninitiated, uncomfortable on the road and very difficult to drive at the limit. As the rest of the industry was embracing anti-lock brakes (ABS) and electronic stability control (ESC), the Viper seemed to shun anything that would have resulted in even mild domestication. Four generations of Dodge Viper would eventually be built (through July of 2010), Unfortunately, years of evolutionary changes improved performance but did little to tame its natural callousness – the old Viper was fast, but unfriendly to the uninitiated, uncomfortable on the road and very difficult to drive at the limit. Chrysler finally ceased production of its flagship in July of 2010, with the promise of a new super sports car diligently in the works. Lighter materials have cut about 100 pounds off the weight off the new chassis. Despite the three-year gap, the 2013 SRT Viper isn't an entirely clean-sheet design. Carried forward from its predecessor is its basic backbone tubular steel space frame, but it has been significantly upgraded with a sturdy-but-lightweight cast magnesium firewall and countless other tweaks including a new aluminum x-brace under the hood (overall, …Hide Full Review