Convenience Front-wheel Drive Sport Utility
2013 Buick Encore

MSRP ?

$25,010
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 1.4LI-4
MPG MPG 25 City / 33 Hwy
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2013 Encore Overview

City, Slicker We admit it. We have no earthly idea how this whole thing is going to shake out. Typically, after driving a new car or truck, we come away prepared to hazard a guess as to whether said model has a good chance of being a sales success. We've amassed enough time watching the industry, scrutinizing the competitors, and so on, to make a reasonably educated bet. Yet here we are, days removed from driving the new 2013 Buick Encore, and we still have no bloody idea. To be fair, we're in good company. Buick's perfectly capable public relations and marketing teams don't appear to entirely know what to expect from the Encore, either. They've had to strain to even find remote competitors to match their new baby against. BMW X1? Volkswagen Tiguan? Mini Countryman? All kinda-sorta-maybe rivals from our vantage point. Yet we can't necessarily provide better ones for this tiny semi-premium crossover, either. Fiscal cliff-discount Land Rover Range Rover Evoque? Uppity Hyundai Tucson? Nissan Juke ravished by Vilner? It's really rather hard to say what plays here. The above panoply of would-be rivals only hints at just how small the Encore is. At 168.5 inches long, it's the shortest Buick in memory – stubbier, remarkably, than such past Trishield outliers as the Skyhawk, Somerset and Reatta. Yet none of this size discussion or the lack of a clearly defined competitive set is to say that the Encore won't be a resounding success. Early signs from dealers – whose initial orders have been six times company estimates – are more than positive, and certainly Buick could do with another crossover underneath its much larger Enclave. There's a faint whiff of children's dress-up – the baby wearing mom or dad's jewelry. Back to the size thing for a moment. Seeing the Encore away from the bright lights of its 2012 Detroit Auto Show reveal and on the street improved our initial impressions. When seen in its proper element, the city, the Encore's scale and proportions start to make a lot more sense, and standard 18-inch alloys do wonders for its presence. Even so, there's no doubt that traditional Buick hallmarks like the Encore's waterfall grille and hood-mounted Ventiports simply look better on larger-scale canvases. There's a faint whiff of children's dress-up here – the baby of the family wearing mom or dad's jewelry, trying to act all grown up. Making a form this small look upscale is no easy task, however, and Buick's stylists have done an admirable job overall. The same goes for the interior, which, at least in full-house spec with optional niceties like leather and navigation, certainly looks the part. Oh, we could debate the merits of the glassy faux wood trim, the occasionally hokey-looking iconography on the seven-inch Intellilink infotainment screen and Buick's continued obsession with a carpet of center stack buttons, but overall, it's a comfortable, upscale place to be, particularly in our tester's saddle motif. In fact, allow us to take a moment …
Full Review

2013 Encore Overview

City, Slicker We admit it. We have no earthly idea how this whole thing is going to shake out. Typically, after driving a new car or truck, we come away prepared to hazard a guess as to whether said model has a good chance of being a sales success. We've amassed enough time watching the industry, scrutinizing the competitors, and so on, to make a reasonably educated bet. Yet here we are, days removed from driving the new 2013 Buick Encore, and we still have no bloody idea. To be fair, we're in good company. Buick's perfectly capable public relations and marketing teams don't appear to entirely know what to expect from the Encore, either. They've had to strain to even find remote competitors to match their new baby against. BMW X1? Volkswagen Tiguan? Mini Countryman? All kinda-sorta-maybe rivals from our vantage point. Yet we can't necessarily provide better ones for this tiny semi-premium crossover, either. Fiscal cliff-discount Land Rover Range Rover Evoque? Uppity Hyundai Tucson? Nissan Juke ravished by Vilner? It's really rather hard to say what plays here. The above panoply of would-be rivals only hints at just how small the Encore is. At 168.5 inches long, it's the shortest Buick in memory – stubbier, remarkably, than such past Trishield outliers as the Skyhawk, Somerset and Reatta. Yet none of this size discussion or the lack of a clearly defined competitive set is to say that the Encore won't be a resounding success. Early signs from dealers – whose initial orders have been six times company estimates – are more than positive, and certainly Buick could do with another crossover underneath its much larger Enclave. There's a faint whiff of children's dress-up – the baby wearing mom or dad's jewelry. Back to the size thing for a moment. Seeing the Encore away from the bright lights of its 2012 Detroit Auto Show reveal and on the street improved our initial impressions. When seen in its proper element, the city, the Encore's scale and proportions start to make a lot more sense, and standard 18-inch alloys do wonders for its presence. Even so, there's no doubt that traditional Buick hallmarks like the Encore's waterfall grille and hood-mounted Ventiports simply look better on larger-scale canvases. There's a faint whiff of children's dress-up here – the baby of the family wearing mom or dad's jewelry, trying to act all grown up. Making a form this small look upscale is no easy task, however, and Buick's stylists have done an admirable job overall. The same goes for the interior, which, at least in full-house spec with optional niceties like leather and navigation, certainly looks the part. Oh, we could debate the merits of the glassy faux wood trim, the occasionally hokey-looking iconography on the seven-inch Intellilink infotainment screen and Buick's continued obsession with a carpet of center stack buttons, but overall, it's a comfortable, upscale place to be, particularly in our tester's saddle motif. In fact, allow us to take a moment …Hide Full Review