2012 Nissan GT-R

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$89,950 - $95,100
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Engine Engine 3.8LV-6
MPG MPG 16 City / 23 Hwy
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2012 GT-R Overview

Japan's Supercar Killer Comes Back Even Stronger 2012 Nissan GT-R - Click above for high-res image gallery Invincible. According to Webster's, the word means "incapable of being conquered, overcome or subdued." The adjective is often used to describe something so superior that it's nearly impossible to overthrow. Want to know what invincibility feels like? Strap yourself into the driver's seat of the 2012 Nissan GT-R, and then press the start button. Just three years after successfully launching its flagship performance vehicle on our shores, the engineers at Nissan have introduced a subtly but completely reworked supercar. The engine has more power, the suspension has been revised, the wheels are lighter, the seats have been redesigned, the brakes are bigger, the chassis is stiffer and the aerodynamics have been reconfigured to improve cooling and provide more downforce. This isn't a manufacturer's token "mid-cycle refresh" to boost sales; these are changes that improve the overall drivability and performance of the GT-R so significantly that most will be inclined to consider it nothing short of a second-generation rebirth. For starters, how does 0-60 in 2.88 seconds sound? Continue reading... %Gallery-115180% Photos copyright ©2011 Drew Phillips / AOL This story really started three years ago this April. That was when we first drove the then-all-new 2009 Nissan GT-R, the spiritual descendant of a long lineage of epic Nissan Skyline sports cars. Its performance was mind-boggling at the time. Under the hood was a twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter V6 developing 480 horsepower and 430 pound-feet of torque. Mated to a standard six-speed sequential dual-clutch rear transaxle, power was sent to the ground through the automaker's ATTESSA E-TS all-wheel-drive system. Nissan didn't officially quote performance figures at the time, but most publications clocked the GT-R's sprint to 60 mph in a scant 3.5 seconds. Quick on the street, it was even more capable on the track. Succinctly delivering this point, its Nürburgring time of just 7:38 put it ahead of the famed Porsche 911 Turbo and Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren. As good as the sports car was, the GT-R's chief vehicle engineer, Kazutoshi Mizuno, never considered the car "done." In fact, Mizuno promised the "real GT-R" would arrive in a few years. Today, I find myself sitting in a meeting room at the Carlton Hotel in Atascadero, California, smack in the middle of the state's central coast. Mizuno is explaining to a handful of journalists the changes that Nissan made to the GT-R for the 2012 model year. Like a proud father (and with every bit as much boast), he goes over each of the vehicle's upgraded subsystems methodically. The details are impressive. While the GT-R has aged very well, Nissan refuses to let its flagship supercar fall from the front of the pack. Pursuing that sole objective, the automaker has made minor changes each year. And, with the exception of the launch control debacle and a series of not-so-insignificant price increases, enthusiasts have welcomed these tweaks that have continued to improve the coupe's performance envelope. However, none of …
Full Review

2012 GT-R Overview

Japan's Supercar Killer Comes Back Even Stronger 2012 Nissan GT-R - Click above for high-res image gallery Invincible. According to Webster's, the word means "incapable of being conquered, overcome or subdued." The adjective is often used to describe something so superior that it's nearly impossible to overthrow. Want to know what invincibility feels like? Strap yourself into the driver's seat of the 2012 Nissan GT-R, and then press the start button. Just three years after successfully launching its flagship performance vehicle on our shores, the engineers at Nissan have introduced a subtly but completely reworked supercar. The engine has more power, the suspension has been revised, the wheels are lighter, the seats have been redesigned, the brakes are bigger, the chassis is stiffer and the aerodynamics have been reconfigured to improve cooling and provide more downforce. This isn't a manufacturer's token "mid-cycle refresh" to boost sales; these are changes that improve the overall drivability and performance of the GT-R so significantly that most will be inclined to consider it nothing short of a second-generation rebirth. For starters, how does 0-60 in 2.88 seconds sound? Continue reading... %Gallery-115180% Photos copyright ©2011 Drew Phillips / AOL This story really started three years ago this April. That was when we first drove the then-all-new 2009 Nissan GT-R, the spiritual descendant of a long lineage of epic Nissan Skyline sports cars. Its performance was mind-boggling at the time. Under the hood was a twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter V6 developing 480 horsepower and 430 pound-feet of torque. Mated to a standard six-speed sequential dual-clutch rear transaxle, power was sent to the ground through the automaker's ATTESSA E-TS all-wheel-drive system. Nissan didn't officially quote performance figures at the time, but most publications clocked the GT-R's sprint to 60 mph in a scant 3.5 seconds. Quick on the street, it was even more capable on the track. Succinctly delivering this point, its Nürburgring time of just 7:38 put it ahead of the famed Porsche 911 Turbo and Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren. As good as the sports car was, the GT-R's chief vehicle engineer, Kazutoshi Mizuno, never considered the car "done." In fact, Mizuno promised the "real GT-R" would arrive in a few years. Today, I find myself sitting in a meeting room at the Carlton Hotel in Atascadero, California, smack in the middle of the state's central coast. Mizuno is explaining to a handful of journalists the changes that Nissan made to the GT-R for the 2012 model year. Like a proud father (and with every bit as much boast), he goes over each of the vehicle's upgraded subsystems methodically. The details are impressive. While the GT-R has aged very well, Nissan refuses to let its flagship supercar fall from the front of the pack. Pursuing that sole objective, the automaker has made minor changes each year. And, with the exception of the launch control debacle and a series of not-so-insignificant price increases, enthusiasts have welcomed these tweaks that have continued to improve the coupe's performance envelope. However, none of …Hide Full Review