SE 4dr Hatchback
2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV

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$31,125
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Engine Engine
MPG MPG 126 City / 99 Hwy
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2012 i-MiEV Overview

The 2012 Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle was designed to allow a driving experience not much different from that of a regular car.The Mitsubishi i is an all-electric car, so there's no reason to stop at a gas station.Instead, you plug it into an outlet to charge it.

After spending a week in one, we found the Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle doesn't function in any way that's significantly different from a conventional car, other than the distance you can travel before having to recharge the batteries.Its range between charges is 62 miles, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.The EPA rated the Mitsubishi i the most fuel efficient vehicle in 2012.

Starting at $29,125, the Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle, also known as the MiEV, is the least expensive electric car from a major manufacturer.By comparison, the Nissan Leaf retails for $32,780, but it comes standard with navigation.The Leaf SL with a quick charge port, upgraded upholstery and other features lists for $33,720.A similarly equipped Mitsubishi i SE with the Premium Package retails for $33,915.Federal tax credits of up to $7,500 are available for buyers of electric vehicles such as the Mitsubishi i, and some states offer credits.

To start the Mitsubishi i, you insert a key into the steering wheel stalk as with a conventional car.Since it's only got electric power, you have to remind yourself, as we did, that there's no engine noise to listen for.Instead, you look for a Ready indicator light to be illuminated within the instrument panel.You also want to look for a number amongst the instrument panel's LED gauges, that being the one farthest to the right.It gives you one number and it's the miles left before you have entirely depleted the lithium-ion battery pack.

A 16 kW electric motor and a lithium-ion battery pack will take you a distance of up to 62 miles when fully charged, according to the EPA.There's a line-graph style gauge that shows the charge similar to a thermometer's setting.When you use the defroster or air-conditioning, it affects the range.

The MiEV, for Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle, comes with a remote device that allows communication with the various vehicle functions.For example, the indicator will light up during charging of the batteries; it blinks when the manual charging is pressed.You can also set the climate control (A/C, heater and defrost) remotely, actuating a pre-defroster mode and turning the air-conditioner off.It's just one example of the fact that this automobile requires that its owners become more involved with it than people have been with more conventional cars.

Charging has four elements, in any case: a charge port that is under a flap just like that for a gasoline-powered car; a charge connector; and finally, a charging source.Using a 110-volt outlet, estimated time for a complete charge, after the batteries have been exhausted, is about 22 hours.Using a 240-volt outlet reduces the charging time to about 6 hours.A quick charge, with a public charging station, is about 30 minutes for an 80 percent charge.(The 12-volt starter battery will be automatically charged, …
Full Review

2012 i-MiEV Overview

The 2012 Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle was designed to allow a driving experience not much different from that of a regular car.The Mitsubishi i is an all-electric car, so there's no reason to stop at a gas station.Instead, you plug it into an outlet to charge it.

After spending a week in one, we found the Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle doesn't function in any way that's significantly different from a conventional car, other than the distance you can travel before having to recharge the batteries.Its range between charges is 62 miles, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.The EPA rated the Mitsubishi i the most fuel efficient vehicle in 2012.

Starting at $29,125, the Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle, also known as the MiEV, is the least expensive electric car from a major manufacturer.By comparison, the Nissan Leaf retails for $32,780, but it comes standard with navigation.The Leaf SL with a quick charge port, upgraded upholstery and other features lists for $33,720.A similarly equipped Mitsubishi i SE with the Premium Package retails for $33,915.Federal tax credits of up to $7,500 are available for buyers of electric vehicles such as the Mitsubishi i, and some states offer credits.

To start the Mitsubishi i, you insert a key into the steering wheel stalk as with a conventional car.Since it's only got electric power, you have to remind yourself, as we did, that there's no engine noise to listen for.Instead, you look for a Ready indicator light to be illuminated within the instrument panel.You also want to look for a number amongst the instrument panel's LED gauges, that being the one farthest to the right.It gives you one number and it's the miles left before you have entirely depleted the lithium-ion battery pack.

A 16 kW electric motor and a lithium-ion battery pack will take you a distance of up to 62 miles when fully charged, according to the EPA.There's a line-graph style gauge that shows the charge similar to a thermometer's setting.When you use the defroster or air-conditioning, it affects the range.

The MiEV, for Mitsubishi i Electric Vehicle, comes with a remote device that allows communication with the various vehicle functions.For example, the indicator will light up during charging of the batteries; it blinks when the manual charging is pressed.You can also set the climate control (A/C, heater and defrost) remotely, actuating a pre-defroster mode and turning the air-conditioner off.It's just one example of the fact that this automobile requires that its owners become more involved with it than people have been with more conventional cars.

Charging has four elements, in any case: a charge port that is under a flap just like that for a gasoline-powered car; a charge connector; and finally, a charging source.Using a 110-volt outlet, estimated time for a complete charge, after the batteries have been exhausted, is about 22 hours.Using a 240-volt outlet reduces the charging time to about 6 hours.A quick charge, with a public charging station, is about 30 minutes for an 80 percent charge.(The 12-volt starter battery will be automatically charged, …Hide Full Review