Base 2dr Roadster
2012 MINI John Cooper Works

MSRP ?

$34,500
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Engine Engine 1.6LI-4
MPG MPG 25 City / 33 Hwy
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2012 John Cooper Works Overview

Struggling To Find A Reason For Being The six basic building blocks of life are sulfur, phosphorus, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and hydrogen. Arrange those in any number of ways and you can get either a single-celled paramecium or Angelina Jolie. The Mini brand works much the same way. Take the same group of engines, interior bits and exterior design elements, combine them in various ways and you get everything from a three-door hatchback to a five-door crossover. It all started with the three-door hatchback, but Mini kept reconfiguring its basic elements to create a full range of automobiles that now includes the Convertible, Clubman wagon, Countryman CUV, a new Roadster, and this little guy: the 2012 Mini Coupe, available for our test purposes with the aggressive John Cooper Works package. All members of the Mini clan, however, share the same DNA and do little to hide their lineage. Truth be told, just the idea of the Mini Coupe has few fans around the Autoblog offices. What point is there to a Mini that's smaller, heavier and more expensive than the standard hatchback? It seems to some that the Coupe exists just because it's an easy and obvious way to configure those basic Mini building blocks. But just because one can build something doesn't always mean one should. There's got to be a reason. Does the Mini Coupe have a reason for being? Or is its existence owed simply to the fact that it could be made, so it was? Incidentally, despite launching at the same time as the Coupe, the Roadster has garnered many fans in our circle. The reason stares you right back in the face when you examine the two: the roadster is a looker. It's raison d'être is that deleting the back seat and using that space to neatly stow the top is a more attractive form of open-top Mini motoring than what the older Convertible provides, which is a top that gets folded and left sitting on the short rear deck where it's exposed and blocks the driver's rearward view. So we applaud the recombination of Mini elements into the Roadster because it's a better convertible than the Convertible (if you can sacrifice two seats). Mini calls it a "helmet" roof and we've heard before that the design inspiration was a backwards baseball cap. The Coupe, however, is not a looker. It would win friends despite its deficiencies were it the most attractive Mini that money can buy, but in fact, it might be the least. Most of the coupe's design is familiar and fine because it comes straight from the Mini parts bin, but where it deviates, particularly the roof, is where we just want to look away. Mini calls it a "helmet" roof and we've heard before that the design inspiration was a backwards baseball cap. That seems plausible, as the roofline tilts sharply upward after the B-pillar and creates a lip spoiler over the rear window that resembles the brim of a baseball …
Full Review

2012 John Cooper Works Overview

Struggling To Find A Reason For Being The six basic building blocks of life are sulfur, phosphorus, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and hydrogen. Arrange those in any number of ways and you can get either a single-celled paramecium or Angelina Jolie. The Mini brand works much the same way. Take the same group of engines, interior bits and exterior design elements, combine them in various ways and you get everything from a three-door hatchback to a five-door crossover. It all started with the three-door hatchback, but Mini kept reconfiguring its basic elements to create a full range of automobiles that now includes the Convertible, Clubman wagon, Countryman CUV, a new Roadster, and this little guy: the 2012 Mini Coupe, available for our test purposes with the aggressive John Cooper Works package. All members of the Mini clan, however, share the same DNA and do little to hide their lineage. Truth be told, just the idea of the Mini Coupe has few fans around the Autoblog offices. What point is there to a Mini that's smaller, heavier and more expensive than the standard hatchback? It seems to some that the Coupe exists just because it's an easy and obvious way to configure those basic Mini building blocks. But just because one can build something doesn't always mean one should. There's got to be a reason. Does the Mini Coupe have a reason for being? Or is its existence owed simply to the fact that it could be made, so it was? Incidentally, despite launching at the same time as the Coupe, the Roadster has garnered many fans in our circle. The reason stares you right back in the face when you examine the two: the roadster is a looker. It's raison d'être is that deleting the back seat and using that space to neatly stow the top is a more attractive form of open-top Mini motoring than what the older Convertible provides, which is a top that gets folded and left sitting on the short rear deck where it's exposed and blocks the driver's rearward view. So we applaud the recombination of Mini elements into the Roadster because it's a better convertible than the Convertible (if you can sacrifice two seats). Mini calls it a "helmet" roof and we've heard before that the design inspiration was a backwards baseball cap. The Coupe, however, is not a looker. It would win friends despite its deficiencies were it the most attractive Mini that money can buy, but in fact, it might be the least. Most of the coupe's design is familiar and fine because it comes straight from the Mini parts bin, but where it deviates, particularly the roof, is where we just want to look away. Mini calls it a "helmet" roof and we've heard before that the design inspiration was a backwards baseball cap. That seems plausible, as the roofline tilts sharply upward after the B-pillar and creates a lip spoiler over the rear window that resembles the brim of a baseball …Hide Full Review