Limited 4dr 4x4
2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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$39,295
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Engine Engine 3.6LV-6
MPG MPG 16 City / 23 Hwy
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2012 Grand Cherokee Overview

Jeep's Best Argument To Skip The Dirt We've just returned from flogging the all-new 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8 on the main 2.5-mile road circuit at Willow Springs Motorsports Park in Southern California. This particular Jeep is nothing like your great-grandfather's Willys, your cousin's lifted CJ or even your little sister's Liberty. Lacking anything close to resembling a Trail Rated badge, this lowered, two-and-a-half ton monster packs a massive 6.4-liter Hemi under its hood, 20-inch forged alloys at each corner and an adaptive damping system to keep body movement in check. Even from a distance, it's hard to miss this four-door's oversized brakes, cannon exhaust pipes and intimidating body cladding. This Jeep looks mean, sounds aggressive and picks fights with sports cars instead of mountains. But what is the point of the Grand Cherokee SRT8? Do its owners race it, or is this simply an exercise to antagonize cavalier Porsche Cayenne and BMW X5 drivers? What are the benefits – and drawbacks – to packing 470 horsepower in an SUV? Can this thing even tow? We found answers to all of those questions and more, during our day on the track and long drive back to Los Angeles. The Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8 arrived on the scene in 2006 when the automaker dropped a 6.1-liter Hemi under the hood of the previous-generation (WK platform) body. Boasting 425 horsepower and a five-speed automatic transmission, the all-wheel-drive first-generation Grand Cherokee SRT8 was capable of sprinting to 60 miles per hour in the high four-second range and topping out at a redline-limited 170 mph. With twin center-mounted exhaust outlets and five-spoke alloy wheels, the monochromatic SUV had the looks to back up its bark. Five years later, the fourth-generation Grand Cherokee rides on a new chassis (WK2 platform) shared with the 2012 Mercedes-Benz M-Class. After delivering its latest Trail Rated off-roader with competent but staid 3.6-liter V6 and 5.7-liter V8 powerplants, Jeep offering an SRT version of the Grand Cherokee was inevitable. Launched at the 2011 New York Auto Show, the second-iteration SRT8 is a vast improvement over its predecessor. According to the automaker, on the tarmac, it's the best performing Jeep vehicle ever, with a 0-60 mph time of 4.8 seconds, a top speed of 160 mph and the ability to stop from 60 mph in just 116 feet. As mentioned, the Grand Cherokee SRT8 version is unmistakable. Lowered one inch compared to the standard models, the SRT8 wears unique wheel flares, side cladding and a one-piece front fascia with new multi-function LED daytime running lights. The standard hood is replaced with a sculpted unit complete with functional ducts serving as heat extractors for the engine compartment. At the rear, there is a high-mounted liftgate spoiler to reduce drag and aerodynamic lift. A one-piece lower rear diffuser separates the new dual-sport exhaust pipes - while they looked wicked, its predecessor's twin center pipes were a nightmare for those who chose fit a trailer hitch. The Grand Cherokee SRT8's interior features SRT-styled Nappa …
Full Review

2012 Grand Cherokee Overview

Jeep's Best Argument To Skip The Dirt We've just returned from flogging the all-new 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8 on the main 2.5-mile road circuit at Willow Springs Motorsports Park in Southern California. This particular Jeep is nothing like your great-grandfather's Willys, your cousin's lifted CJ or even your little sister's Liberty. Lacking anything close to resembling a Trail Rated badge, this lowered, two-and-a-half ton monster packs a massive 6.4-liter Hemi under its hood, 20-inch forged alloys at each corner and an adaptive damping system to keep body movement in check. Even from a distance, it's hard to miss this four-door's oversized brakes, cannon exhaust pipes and intimidating body cladding. This Jeep looks mean, sounds aggressive and picks fights with sports cars instead of mountains. But what is the point of the Grand Cherokee SRT8? Do its owners race it, or is this simply an exercise to antagonize cavalier Porsche Cayenne and BMW X5 drivers? What are the benefits – and drawbacks – to packing 470 horsepower in an SUV? Can this thing even tow? We found answers to all of those questions and more, during our day on the track and long drive back to Los Angeles. The Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8 arrived on the scene in 2006 when the automaker dropped a 6.1-liter Hemi under the hood of the previous-generation (WK platform) body. Boasting 425 horsepower and a five-speed automatic transmission, the all-wheel-drive first-generation Grand Cherokee SRT8 was capable of sprinting to 60 miles per hour in the high four-second range and topping out at a redline-limited 170 mph. With twin center-mounted exhaust outlets and five-spoke alloy wheels, the monochromatic SUV had the looks to back up its bark. Five years later, the fourth-generation Grand Cherokee rides on a new chassis (WK2 platform) shared with the 2012 Mercedes-Benz M-Class. After delivering its latest Trail Rated off-roader with competent but staid 3.6-liter V6 and 5.7-liter V8 powerplants, Jeep offering an SRT version of the Grand Cherokee was inevitable. Launched at the 2011 New York Auto Show, the second-iteration SRT8 is a vast improvement over its predecessor. According to the automaker, on the tarmac, it's the best performing Jeep vehicle ever, with a 0-60 mph time of 4.8 seconds, a top speed of 160 mph and the ability to stop from 60 mph in just 116 feet. As mentioned, the Grand Cherokee SRT8 version is unmistakable. Lowered one inch compared to the standard models, the SRT8 wears unique wheel flares, side cladding and a one-piece front fascia with new multi-function LED daytime running lights. The standard hood is replaced with a sculpted unit complete with functional ducts serving as heat extractors for the engine compartment. At the rear, there is a high-mounted liftgate spoiler to reduce drag and aerodynamic lift. A one-piece lower rear diffuser separates the new dual-sport exhaust pipes - while they looked wicked, its predecessor's twin center pipes were a nightmare for those who chose fit a trailer hitch. The Grand Cherokee SRT8's interior features SRT-styled Nappa …Hide Full Review