GLS 4dr Sedan
2012 Hyundai Accent

MSRP ?

$12,545
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 1.6LI-4
MPG MPG 28 City / 37 Hwy
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2012 Accent Overview

Serving Notice To The Subcompact Segment 2012 Hyundai Accent Five-Door - Click above for high-res image gallery It's been a busy two years in the subcompact world. Newcomers like the Ford Fiesta and Mazda2 have made it clear they intend to give models like the Honda Fit, Toyota Yaris and segment volume leader Nissan Versa a run for their small-displacement money. Even General Motors is getting into the fray with the upcoming 2012 Chevrolet Sonic after years of trying to pass off the Aveo as legitimate transportation. So when Hyundai announced it was taking the knife to its Accent, we knew to expect good things. The Korean automaker hasn't been one to mess around lately, and vehicles like the all-new Elantra and redesigned Sonata have helped push the manufacturer to the highest market share in the company's history – 5.6 percent in May. With the segment's first direct-injection four-cylinder engine, the buyer's choice of a six-speed manual or automatic transmission, an impossibly low MSRP and 40 mpg highway from every model, it's clear that the 2012 Hyundai Accent is intent on eclipsing the competition. Hyundai has wrapped the 2012 Accent in the company's fluidic design styling, and while some feel the language can be a bit overwrought on models like the Sonata, it looks right at home on a canvas this small. Up front, designers have paired the corporate hexagonal grille with aggressive headlights and stylized fog lamps set low in the front fascia for an expressive face that flows easily into the hatchback's side. Lines pull from the headlights into the hood and up the A-pillar for a cohesive look. Similarly, an athletic crease originates at the front fog lights and runs upward all the way to the vehicle's tail lamps for a sense of motion. A small up-kick in the C-pillar and a sloping roof line protect the five-door from looking overly boxy or cumbersome, and our tester came with attractive 16-inch alloy wheels shod in low-rolling resistance rubber. The rear of the vehicle offers a large, attractive valance with inset reflective markers, while tall taillamps skirt a narrow-ish hatch. The back glass has been kept somewhat small for our tastes, though a roof-mounted spoiler is standard on all models. The design is clean and well-executed on the whole, though the center-mounted latch handle looks like an afterthought. Hyundai offers the 2012 Accent with three interior colors – beige, gray and black. Our tester came in the darkest of that trio, though we'd pick the two-tone beige option if it were our name on the dotted line. Regardless of color, the upper dash is drawn with sweeping lines that flow downward toward the thin center stack and shift lever. It's a good look that strikes us as more mature (if traditional) than competitors like the upcoming Sonic or even the Fiesta. Hyundai hasn't shied away from using hard plastics on the dash and waterfall, though the pieces don't feel cheap or easily-scratched. Instead of lacing the pieces in …
Full Review

2012 Accent Overview

Serving Notice To The Subcompact Segment 2012 Hyundai Accent Five-Door - Click above for high-res image gallery It's been a busy two years in the subcompact world. Newcomers like the Ford Fiesta and Mazda2 have made it clear they intend to give models like the Honda Fit, Toyota Yaris and segment volume leader Nissan Versa a run for their small-displacement money. Even General Motors is getting into the fray with the upcoming 2012 Chevrolet Sonic after years of trying to pass off the Aveo as legitimate transportation. So when Hyundai announced it was taking the knife to its Accent, we knew to expect good things. The Korean automaker hasn't been one to mess around lately, and vehicles like the all-new Elantra and redesigned Sonata have helped push the manufacturer to the highest market share in the company's history – 5.6 percent in May. With the segment's first direct-injection four-cylinder engine, the buyer's choice of a six-speed manual or automatic transmission, an impossibly low MSRP and 40 mpg highway from every model, it's clear that the 2012 Hyundai Accent is intent on eclipsing the competition. Hyundai has wrapped the 2012 Accent in the company's fluidic design styling, and while some feel the language can be a bit overwrought on models like the Sonata, it looks right at home on a canvas this small. Up front, designers have paired the corporate hexagonal grille with aggressive headlights and stylized fog lamps set low in the front fascia for an expressive face that flows easily into the hatchback's side. Lines pull from the headlights into the hood and up the A-pillar for a cohesive look. Similarly, an athletic crease originates at the front fog lights and runs upward all the way to the vehicle's tail lamps for a sense of motion. A small up-kick in the C-pillar and a sloping roof line protect the five-door from looking overly boxy or cumbersome, and our tester came with attractive 16-inch alloy wheels shod in low-rolling resistance rubber. The rear of the vehicle offers a large, attractive valance with inset reflective markers, while tall taillamps skirt a narrow-ish hatch. The back glass has been kept somewhat small for our tastes, though a roof-mounted spoiler is standard on all models. The design is clean and well-executed on the whole, though the center-mounted latch handle looks like an afterthought. Hyundai offers the 2012 Accent with three interior colors – beige, gray and black. Our tester came in the darkest of that trio, though we'd pick the two-tone beige option if it were our name on the dotted line. Regardless of color, the upper dash is drawn with sweeping lines that flow downward toward the thin center stack and shift lever. It's a good look that strikes us as more mature (if traditional) than competitors like the upcoming Sonic or even the Fiesta. Hyundai hasn't shied away from using hard plastics on the dash and waterfall, though the pieces don't feel cheap or easily-scratched. Instead of lacing the pieces in …Hide Full Review