2012 Cadillac SRX

MSRP ?

$35,985 - $49,585
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Engine Engine 3.6LV-6
MPG MPG 17 City / 24 Hwy
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2012 SRX Overview

Cadillac's Best-Seller Goes RX Hunting With New Ammunition While standing in front of the newly updated 2012 Cadillac SRX, a fellow journalist asked Cadillac Communications Manager David Caldwell why the crossover wasn't based on a rear-wheel-drive chassis. The answer? "We already tried that," said Caldwell. Those who pray to the gods of rear-wheel drive can go ahead and throw your hands in the air. Smack your forehead, toss down your napkin in disgust and walk away from the dinner table. The truth is simple: The masses like their upscale 'utes to be behave like their midsize luxury sedans. They want comfort and predictability when traipsing from the mall to school, on road trips and everything in between, albeit with a higher seating position, room for cargo out back and an air of stylish sophistication. But is that really a bad thing? The proof is in the pudding, and today's pudding is flavored by sales figures. The previous-generation Cadillac SRX seemingly ticked all the boxes that set enthusiast's hearts aflutter – a well-engineered rear-wheel-drive chassis (GM's Sigma platform) with optional all-wheel drive, a standard high-output 3.6-liter V6 engine or an optional 320-horsepower Northstar V8, and your choice of a five- or six-speed automatic gearbox wedged between. The automotive pressed loved the first-gen SRX. It took home Car and Driver's Best Luxury SUV award in 2004, 2005 and 2006 and was a finalist for the North American Truck of the Year award in '04. And yet it never even came close to matching its major competitors where it truly counts – the sales floor. And then came a new Cadillac SRX in 2010, and through the bespeckled eyes of auto journalists, everything seems backwards. A transversely mounted V6 engine displacing 3.0 liters sent 265 horses to the front wheels in its base configuration, and while all-wheel drive was still optional, the Theta Premium chassis was never intended for tail-wagging antics. There was an available 2.8-liter turbocharged V6, but it didn't make up for the missing V8, and it was canceled due to slow sales after a single year on the market. Great wails were heard from Detroit to Los Angeles, but it wasn't the sound of exasperation some expected. Instead, we heard the unmistakable beat of high-fives at GM's Renaissance Center headquarters; the cymbals of cash registers ringing in Cadillac dealerships all over the country. In one fell swoop, the Cadillac of Crossovers vaulted itself from a languishing ninth spot in the luxury crossover segment all the way up to second. And as much as Cadillac would love to wrangle the gold medal from the Lexus RX, a solid silver signals a job well done. It comes as little surprise, then, that Cadillac chose not to alter the formula much when it refreshed the SRX for the 2012 model year. To the casual observer, a 2012 model parked next to its predecessor doesn't impart any of the major changes found under the highly creased sheetmetal. So let's dig deeper. First and foremost, …
Full Review

2012 SRX Overview

Cadillac's Best-Seller Goes RX Hunting With New Ammunition While standing in front of the newly updated 2012 Cadillac SRX, a fellow journalist asked Cadillac Communications Manager David Caldwell why the crossover wasn't based on a rear-wheel-drive chassis. The answer? "We already tried that," said Caldwell. Those who pray to the gods of rear-wheel drive can go ahead and throw your hands in the air. Smack your forehead, toss down your napkin in disgust and walk away from the dinner table. The truth is simple: The masses like their upscale 'utes to be behave like their midsize luxury sedans. They want comfort and predictability when traipsing from the mall to school, on road trips and everything in between, albeit with a higher seating position, room for cargo out back and an air of stylish sophistication. But is that really a bad thing? The proof is in the pudding, and today's pudding is flavored by sales figures. The previous-generation Cadillac SRX seemingly ticked all the boxes that set enthusiast's hearts aflutter – a well-engineered rear-wheel-drive chassis (GM's Sigma platform) with optional all-wheel drive, a standard high-output 3.6-liter V6 engine or an optional 320-horsepower Northstar V8, and your choice of a five- or six-speed automatic gearbox wedged between. The automotive pressed loved the first-gen SRX. It took home Car and Driver's Best Luxury SUV award in 2004, 2005 and 2006 and was a finalist for the North American Truck of the Year award in '04. And yet it never even came close to matching its major competitors where it truly counts – the sales floor. And then came a new Cadillac SRX in 2010, and through the bespeckled eyes of auto journalists, everything seems backwards. A transversely mounted V6 engine displacing 3.0 liters sent 265 horses to the front wheels in its base configuration, and while all-wheel drive was still optional, the Theta Premium chassis was never intended for tail-wagging antics. There was an available 2.8-liter turbocharged V6, but it didn't make up for the missing V8, and it was canceled due to slow sales after a single year on the market. Great wails were heard from Detroit to Los Angeles, but it wasn't the sound of exasperation some expected. Instead, we heard the unmistakable beat of high-fives at GM's Renaissance Center headquarters; the cymbals of cash registers ringing in Cadillac dealerships all over the country. In one fell swoop, the Cadillac of Crossovers vaulted itself from a languishing ninth spot in the luxury crossover segment all the way up to second. And as much as Cadillac would love to wrangle the gold medal from the Lexus RX, a solid silver signals a job well done. It comes as little surprise, then, that Cadillac chose not to alter the formula much when it refreshed the SRX for the 2012 model year. To the casual observer, a 2012 model parked next to its predecessor doesn't impart any of the major changes found under the highly creased sheetmetal. So let's dig deeper. First and foremost, …Hide Full Review