2.0T Premium Plus 2dr All-wheel Drive quattro Roadster
2012 Audi TTS

MSRP ?

$50,000
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N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 23 City / 31 Hwy
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2012 TTS Overview

Learning To Love The TT Middle Child Before we get started down this rabbit hole, I feel obligated to come clean. I love the Audi TT RS. I love the top-tier TT the way nose bleeds love blow. The high-strung five-cylinder has carved out a warm nook in my bitter black heart because, at the end of the day, the TT RS is physical manifestation of what I thought the entire TT line should have been from the very start. When the first-generation model bowed in 1998, it did so as a powder-puff poser penned more to capitalize on the machine's Auto Union heritage than it did the performance lust of buyers looking for an all-wheel drive heathen. Here was a car with inarguably iconic styling saddled with all the pulse-quickening performance of someone else's cold oatmeal. The TT has grown up considerably since those early days. Its lines have evolved from precise architectural arches into the organic curves of a well-toned body, and the TT RS supplies that skin with the kind of muscle that can scoot the coupe to 60 mph in a mere 4.1 seconds. If you're counting, that's within spitting distance of the same time laid down by the mighty R8. So, with a base model happily capable of catering to the style-minded consumers of the world and the TT RS more than willing to serve under the heels of hardcore performance-oriented buyers, why bother offering the TTS at all? Because there's always something to be said for the middle ground. The Audi TTS is set apart from more common models with a range of aesthetic and mechanical tricks. Those start with the addition of a matte-chrome version of the corporate single-frame grille, but also include a more aggressive front fascia to match. The changes wear well on the TTS and help give the machine a leaner, sportier look compared to lower trims. The larger air inlets nestled down low, attractive fog lamp bezels and handsome LED daytime running lights are all suitably Audi, and the heavily contoured sheetmetal of the clamshell hood and flared fenders help integrate the new bumper cover nicely. TTS guise affords the coupe a few other special touches, including a pair of aluminized side-view mirror caps and a set of very handsome 19-inch tri-spoke wheels. Move to the coupe's rear and expect to be met with a reworked valance. The bumper cover accommodates a set of quad exhaust tips designed to hint at the uprated turbocharged four-cylinder under the hood. As always, the speed-actuated rear spoiler stays on as a bit of functional eye candy. The driver can coax the mechanized wing up or down via a push of a console-mounted button as he or she sees fit. Kids love it. Pressing the TTS into Sport mode turns the coupe fiercely rigid in a way that would make the minds at Viagra blush. As much fun as entertaining the traffic around you with an electro-mechanical puppet show can be, the center …
Full Review

2012 TTS Overview

Learning To Love The TT Middle Child Before we get started down this rabbit hole, I feel obligated to come clean. I love the Audi TT RS. I love the top-tier TT the way nose bleeds love blow. The high-strung five-cylinder has carved out a warm nook in my bitter black heart because, at the end of the day, the TT RS is physical manifestation of what I thought the entire TT line should have been from the very start. When the first-generation model bowed in 1998, it did so as a powder-puff poser penned more to capitalize on the machine's Auto Union heritage than it did the performance lust of buyers looking for an all-wheel drive heathen. Here was a car with inarguably iconic styling saddled with all the pulse-quickening performance of someone else's cold oatmeal. The TT has grown up considerably since those early days. Its lines have evolved from precise architectural arches into the organic curves of a well-toned body, and the TT RS supplies that skin with the kind of muscle that can scoot the coupe to 60 mph in a mere 4.1 seconds. If you're counting, that's within spitting distance of the same time laid down by the mighty R8. So, with a base model happily capable of catering to the style-minded consumers of the world and the TT RS more than willing to serve under the heels of hardcore performance-oriented buyers, why bother offering the TTS at all? Because there's always something to be said for the middle ground. The Audi TTS is set apart from more common models with a range of aesthetic and mechanical tricks. Those start with the addition of a matte-chrome version of the corporate single-frame grille, but also include a more aggressive front fascia to match. The changes wear well on the TTS and help give the machine a leaner, sportier look compared to lower trims. The larger air inlets nestled down low, attractive fog lamp bezels and handsome LED daytime running lights are all suitably Audi, and the heavily contoured sheetmetal of the clamshell hood and flared fenders help integrate the new bumper cover nicely. TTS guise affords the coupe a few other special touches, including a pair of aluminized side-view mirror caps and a set of very handsome 19-inch tri-spoke wheels. Move to the coupe's rear and expect to be met with a reworked valance. The bumper cover accommodates a set of quad exhaust tips designed to hint at the uprated turbocharged four-cylinder under the hood. As always, the speed-actuated rear spoiler stays on as a bit of functional eye candy. The driver can coax the mechanized wing up or down via a push of a console-mounted button as he or she sees fit. Kids love it. Pressing the TTS into Sport mode turns the coupe fiercely rigid in a way that would make the minds at Viagra blush. As much fun as entertaining the traffic around you with an electro-mechanical puppet show can be, the center …Hide Full Review