Targa 4S 2dr All-wheel Drive Coupe
2011 Porsche 911

MSRP ?

$104,800
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
Hassle Free Quote
Engine Engine 3.8LH-6
MPG MPG 17 City / 25 Hwy
More More View All Specs

2011 911 Overview

The Best Everyday 911 You Can Buy, Today Twenty-two. That's how many Porsche 911 variants are available right now. And by this time next year, they'll all be obsolete. But this one – the 2011 Porsche 911 GTS – is the pick of the litter. It's the definition of the daily-driver's supercar and comes equipped with everything you need in a Type 997. It's perfect. You want it. And you want it now. Just please forget about the Type 991 peering out from behind the curtain... The GTS is the 997's swan song. It's everything Porsche has learned over the course of the current 911's tenure distilled into a package that's aimed at street drivers, not weekend racers. The specs aren't particularly mind-blowing and the acceleration doesn't warp the space/time continuum like some other 911s, but that's not the point. It's the best 911 today because it flatters and inspires. It revels in its parts-binifcation like few things we've driven. It's pure, but not unhinged. It's balanced, but not comprised. It's a rolling love letter to anyone smart enough to choose it among the scads of other 911 variants (a few million if you do the math). It's also the favorite 911 of a certain Porsche mechanic we met at a Shell station outside of Monterey. And that says... something. Oh, and one other thing: The GTS is something of a bargain when you look at what it takes to bring a 997 Carrera S, the 911 variant one rung below it on the ladder, up to same level. Let's start with output. The standard Carrera S (again, the 997) comes equipped with 385 horsepower from its 3.8-liter flat-six. The GTS ups the game to 408 horsepower at 7,300 rpm thanks to the standard fitment of the $16,900 Powerkit option (tweaks to the intake and exhaust tracts) on the outgoing 997 S. But surprisingly, it's the torque that impresses from behind the wheel. Twist is up to 310 pound-feet at 4,200 rpm, but with 238 lb-ft available practically from idle, it's the linearity of its delivery that shines through and helps achieve a 4.4-second run to 60 miles per hour. You've got over 3,000 revs worth of shove at your command, which means fiddling with the glorious – and standard – six-speed manual is kept to a minimum when hustling through the bends. An optional PDK dual-clutch automatic commands an extra $4,320, but only the seriously tri-pedal-allergic would be advised to nix the stick thanks to its precise throws and light-but-engaged clutch pedal. You enjoy this setup around town, not endure it. Other features? The 19-inch, center-lock black wheels shod in Michelin Pilot Sport PS2s (235/35 R19 up front and 305/30 R19 in the rear) would run you well over $6K at the dealer, while the Sport Design front end and steering wheel, Alcantra-coated interior and other assorted baubles would bring the price of your faux-GTS into near-GT3 range. So what's the price of the GTS? $103,100. To start, natch. …
Full Review

2011 911 Overview

The Best Everyday 911 You Can Buy, Today Twenty-two. That's how many Porsche 911 variants are available right now. And by this time next year, they'll all be obsolete. But this one – the 2011 Porsche 911 GTS – is the pick of the litter. It's the definition of the daily-driver's supercar and comes equipped with everything you need in a Type 997. It's perfect. You want it. And you want it now. Just please forget about the Type 991 peering out from behind the curtain... The GTS is the 997's swan song. It's everything Porsche has learned over the course of the current 911's tenure distilled into a package that's aimed at street drivers, not weekend racers. The specs aren't particularly mind-blowing and the acceleration doesn't warp the space/time continuum like some other 911s, but that's not the point. It's the best 911 today because it flatters and inspires. It revels in its parts-binifcation like few things we've driven. It's pure, but not unhinged. It's balanced, but not comprised. It's a rolling love letter to anyone smart enough to choose it among the scads of other 911 variants (a few million if you do the math). It's also the favorite 911 of a certain Porsche mechanic we met at a Shell station outside of Monterey. And that says... something. Oh, and one other thing: The GTS is something of a bargain when you look at what it takes to bring a 997 Carrera S, the 911 variant one rung below it on the ladder, up to same level. Let's start with output. The standard Carrera S (again, the 997) comes equipped with 385 horsepower from its 3.8-liter flat-six. The GTS ups the game to 408 horsepower at 7,300 rpm thanks to the standard fitment of the $16,900 Powerkit option (tweaks to the intake and exhaust tracts) on the outgoing 997 S. But surprisingly, it's the torque that impresses from behind the wheel. Twist is up to 310 pound-feet at 4,200 rpm, but with 238 lb-ft available practically from idle, it's the linearity of its delivery that shines through and helps achieve a 4.4-second run to 60 miles per hour. You've got over 3,000 revs worth of shove at your command, which means fiddling with the glorious – and standard – six-speed manual is kept to a minimum when hustling through the bends. An optional PDK dual-clutch automatic commands an extra $4,320, but only the seriously tri-pedal-allergic would be advised to nix the stick thanks to its precise throws and light-but-engaged clutch pedal. You enjoy this setup around town, not endure it. Other features? The 19-inch, center-lock black wheels shod in Michelin Pilot Sport PS2s (235/35 R19 up front and 305/30 R19 in the rear) would run you well over $6K at the dealer, while the Sport Design front end and steering wheel, Alcantra-coated interior and other assorted baubles would bring the price of your faux-GTS into near-GT3 range. So what's the price of the GTS? $103,100. To start, natch. …Hide Full Review