2011 Nissan Xterra

MSRP ?

$24,260 - $29,670
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N/A
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Engine Engine 4.0LV-6
MPG MPG 16 City / 22 Hwy
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2011 Xterra Overview

A Bonafide SUV That Refuses To Be CUV-ified 2011 Nissan Xterra Pro-4X - Click above for high-res image gallery There was a time when body-on-frame SUVs dominated American roads, with nearly every major automaker offering some kind of four-wheeling fighter to suburbia's off-road pretenders. Nissan was no different, and at its peak in 2000, the eminently capable Xterra sold some 88,000 copies – the same year our colleagues at Motor Trend crowned it Sport Utility of the Year. But unlike so many hardened off-roaders that have evolved into unibody crossovers, the Xterra has soldiered on nearly unchanged since its refresh in 2005. And according to our sources, this latest variant – the Pro-4X – could be the last of an orphaned breed. We got our hands on Nissan's most capable SUV for a week of highway drudgery, big-box shopping and even a little time off the beaten path to find out if it deserves to live on. Continue reading Review: 2011 Nissan Xterra Pro-4X... %Gallery-120809% Photos copyright ©2011 Chris Shunk / AOL ThePro-4X is the top-of-the-line Xterra. Typically that would mean plenty of standard features to coddle and cushion. There's a lot of that going on here, but we're not talking about navigation, leather seats or moonroofs. You can't even get a power driver's seat. Instead, the Pro-4X comes strong with Bilstein shocks, hill descent control, an electronic locking rear differential and a trick cargo management system that will keep your gear tethered to the floor even when your Xterra is upside-down. If you're into coddling equipment, this Xterra isn't your cup of joe. The only pampering we could find was a blissful Rockford Fosgate sound system, which should provide sufficient motivation while crawling over rocks and down steep grades. The only option boxes checked on our $32,725 (a base Xterra X 4X4 comes in at $26,310) tester included leather seats ($1,000), Nevada tow Package ($460), Pro-4X floormats ($115) and an iPod interface ($250). Any off-roader worth its salt also has to look the part, and the Xterra doesn't disappoint. Its boxy proportions and broad shoulders scream "testosterone booster," while the Xterra's customary roof rack gives this ute an inescapable Panama Jack flavor. That roof rack (accessible with a pair of built-in bumper steps) contains a pair of off-roading lights that most will rarely use, though we found them to be very helpful on a barren stretch of two-lane highway that involved close encounters with both a possum and a deer within a few minutes of each other. The rough and ready exterior is matched by an equally manly cabin. The nicely upholstered leather seats were plenty comfortable during a five-hour trip we took from Detroit to Indianapolis, and the leather-wrapped steering wheel provided a touch of class in an otherwise utilitarian interior. There are few buttons and knobs adorning the center stack, and dashboard materials are mostly of the hard plastic variety. Perhaps that's to be expected of such an off-road-biased vehicle, but so are easily accessible vehicle controls. …
Full Review

2011 Xterra Overview

A Bonafide SUV That Refuses To Be CUV-ified 2011 Nissan Xterra Pro-4X - Click above for high-res image gallery There was a time when body-on-frame SUVs dominated American roads, with nearly every major automaker offering some kind of four-wheeling fighter to suburbia's off-road pretenders. Nissan was no different, and at its peak in 2000, the eminently capable Xterra sold some 88,000 copies – the same year our colleagues at Motor Trend crowned it Sport Utility of the Year. But unlike so many hardened off-roaders that have evolved into unibody crossovers, the Xterra has soldiered on nearly unchanged since its refresh in 2005. And according to our sources, this latest variant – the Pro-4X – could be the last of an orphaned breed. We got our hands on Nissan's most capable SUV for a week of highway drudgery, big-box shopping and even a little time off the beaten path to find out if it deserves to live on. Continue reading Review: 2011 Nissan Xterra Pro-4X... %Gallery-120809% Photos copyright ©2011 Chris Shunk / AOL ThePro-4X is the top-of-the-line Xterra. Typically that would mean plenty of standard features to coddle and cushion. There's a lot of that going on here, but we're not talking about navigation, leather seats or moonroofs. You can't even get a power driver's seat. Instead, the Pro-4X comes strong with Bilstein shocks, hill descent control, an electronic locking rear differential and a trick cargo management system that will keep your gear tethered to the floor even when your Xterra is upside-down. If you're into coddling equipment, this Xterra isn't your cup of joe. The only pampering we could find was a blissful Rockford Fosgate sound system, which should provide sufficient motivation while crawling over rocks and down steep grades. The only option boxes checked on our $32,725 (a base Xterra X 4X4 comes in at $26,310) tester included leather seats ($1,000), Nevada tow Package ($460), Pro-4X floormats ($115) and an iPod interface ($250). Any off-roader worth its salt also has to look the part, and the Xterra doesn't disappoint. Its boxy proportions and broad shoulders scream "testosterone booster," while the Xterra's customary roof rack gives this ute an inescapable Panama Jack flavor. That roof rack (accessible with a pair of built-in bumper steps) contains a pair of off-roading lights that most will rarely use, though we found them to be very helpful on a barren stretch of two-lane highway that involved close encounters with both a possum and a deer within a few minutes of each other. The rough and ready exterior is matched by an equally manly cabin. The nicely upholstered leather seats were plenty comfortable during a five-hour trip we took from Detroit to Indianapolis, and the leather-wrapped steering wheel provided a touch of class in an otherwise utilitarian interior. There are few buttons and knobs adorning the center stack, and dashboard materials are mostly of the hard plastic variety. Perhaps that's to be expected of such an off-road-biased vehicle, but so are easily accessible vehicle controls. …Hide Full Review