2011 Nissan Quest

MSRP ?

$27,750 - $41,350
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Engine Engine 3.5LV-6
MPG MPG 19 City / 24 Hwy
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2011 Quest Overview

Nissan Emerges From The Kitchen With Something New 2011 Nissan Quest - Click above for high-res image gallery You can get vanilla ice cream in an array of varieties. There's New York Vanilla (the classic flavor), French Vanilla, Vanilla Bean, Homestyle Vanilla, Creamy Vanilla and Country Vanilla. Regardless of the subtle differences, each frozen delight is only a mild modification of the same mixture of milk, cream, sugar and vanilla beans. While generally bland and lackluster when compared to Rocky Road, Carmel Ribbon and Mint Chip, good old-fashioned vanilla ice cream enjoys an enormous following and offends few, making it the best-selling flavor in the freezer section. If you make ice cream and want to sell in volume, get on the horn to your friends in Madagascar. Minivans are a lot like vanilla ice cream. No matter how hard the automakers try to differentiate their product, all of today's minivans are essentially mildly altered concoctions blending seven-passenger, front-engine, front-wheel drive, six-cylinder, highly-utilitarian ingredients. Yet, like vanilla ice cream, they are part of a segment that cannot be ignored, and they do surprisingly well at satisfying a broad degree of palates. In the case of nearly every automaker, if you're building family vehicles, you offer a minivan. Nissan has released its all-new 2011 Quest and it's a minivan formulated with today's all-too familiar ingredients, but unlike the rest of the vanilla troop, the Quest could leave a unique taste in your mouth. Has Nissan broken new ground with its new family transport, or are they just offering consumers the same dessert with just a different label? Read on for the answer. Continue reading... %Gallery-111489% Photos copyright ©2010 Michael Harley / AOL, Nissan The Nissan Quest has been around for nearly two decades. Originally introduced in 1992, the first- and second-generation models offered six-cylinder front-wheel drive powertrains and seven-passenger interiors. Both models were manufactured in Ford's Avon Lake, Ohio assembly plant, allowing the American automaker rights to re-brand and sell Quests as the now-forgotten Mercury Villager. Unfortunately, the Quest's short wheelbase made it tough to compete in a segment with the long-wheelbase Honda Odyssey, Toyota Sienna and Chrysler/Dodge twins. That changed dramatically when the third-generation model debuted in 2004. Assembled in Nissan's then-new Canton, Mississippi plant, the Quest returned with a traditional powertrain and passenger configuration and a much longer wheelbase. It also appeared with avant-garde sheetmetal and a radical center-mounted instrument pod that was bold - so bold the automaker redesigned the dashboard for the 2007 model year. Plagued with early quality issues and tough competition, sales fell from nearly 50,000 annual units in 2004, to under 9,000 units in 2009, with the Quest opting out of the competition for 2010. Nissan introduced an all-new 2011 Quest for the North American market at the 2010 Los Angeles Auto Show (the Japanese-market Nissan Elgrand, wearing only slightly different cosmetics, debuted in Japan several months earlier). Compared to its predecessor, the 2011 Quest is four inches shorter in length, one inch taller, yet …
Full Review

2011 Quest Overview

Nissan Emerges From The Kitchen With Something New 2011 Nissan Quest - Click above for high-res image gallery You can get vanilla ice cream in an array of varieties. There's New York Vanilla (the classic flavor), French Vanilla, Vanilla Bean, Homestyle Vanilla, Creamy Vanilla and Country Vanilla. Regardless of the subtle differences, each frozen delight is only a mild modification of the same mixture of milk, cream, sugar and vanilla beans. While generally bland and lackluster when compared to Rocky Road, Carmel Ribbon and Mint Chip, good old-fashioned vanilla ice cream enjoys an enormous following and offends few, making it the best-selling flavor in the freezer section. If you make ice cream and want to sell in volume, get on the horn to your friends in Madagascar. Minivans are a lot like vanilla ice cream. No matter how hard the automakers try to differentiate their product, all of today's minivans are essentially mildly altered concoctions blending seven-passenger, front-engine, front-wheel drive, six-cylinder, highly-utilitarian ingredients. Yet, like vanilla ice cream, they are part of a segment that cannot be ignored, and they do surprisingly well at satisfying a broad degree of palates. In the case of nearly every automaker, if you're building family vehicles, you offer a minivan. Nissan has released its all-new 2011 Quest and it's a minivan formulated with today's all-too familiar ingredients, but unlike the rest of the vanilla troop, the Quest could leave a unique taste in your mouth. Has Nissan broken new ground with its new family transport, or are they just offering consumers the same dessert with just a different label? Read on for the answer. Continue reading... %Gallery-111489% Photos copyright ©2010 Michael Harley / AOL, Nissan The Nissan Quest has been around for nearly two decades. Originally introduced in 1992, the first- and second-generation models offered six-cylinder front-wheel drive powertrains and seven-passenger interiors. Both models were manufactured in Ford's Avon Lake, Ohio assembly plant, allowing the American automaker rights to re-brand and sell Quests as the now-forgotten Mercury Villager. Unfortunately, the Quest's short wheelbase made it tough to compete in a segment with the long-wheelbase Honda Odyssey, Toyota Sienna and Chrysler/Dodge twins. That changed dramatically when the third-generation model debuted in 2004. Assembled in Nissan's then-new Canton, Mississippi plant, the Quest returned with a traditional powertrain and passenger configuration and a much longer wheelbase. It also appeared with avant-garde sheetmetal and a radical center-mounted instrument pod that was bold - so bold the automaker redesigned the dashboard for the 2007 model year. Plagued with early quality issues and tough competition, sales fell from nearly 50,000 annual units in 2004, to under 9,000 units in 2009, with the Quest opting out of the competition for 2010. Nissan introduced an all-new 2011 Quest for the North American market at the 2010 Los Angeles Auto Show (the Japanese-market Nissan Elgrand, wearing only slightly different cosmetics, debuted in Japan several months earlier). Compared to its predecessor, the 2011 Quest is four inches shorter in length, one inch taller, yet …Hide Full Review