i SV 4dr Front-wheel Drive
2011 Mazda CX-7

MSRP ?

$21,990
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.5LI-4
MPG MPG 20 City / 28 Hwy
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2011 CX-7 Overview

Is Zoom-Zoom More Important Than Room-Room? 2011 Mazda CX-7 - Click above for high-res image gallery When we think of mid-size crossovers, words like "comfort," "convenience" and "roominess" are the first things to spring to mind. For some CUVs, those are accurate descriptions, but the Mazda CX-7 also has to fulfill a Zoom-Zoom promise. For the past 11 years, Mazda's mantra has meant that driving excitement must be injected into every vehicle it builds, whether it's a roadster like the MX-5 Miata or a minivan like the Mazda5. Athletic handling is a no-brainer for sports cars like the RX-8, but crossover owners typically expect creature comforts, utility and a smooth ride. We've been won over by the CX-7's sporty genes before, but the crossover field is far thicker and more talented than it was back in 2007 when the CX-7 first hit the scene. Does this Mazda softroader still strike the right balance? We spent a week getting reacquainted with 2011 CX-7 Grand Touring to find out. When ordering a CX-7, Mazda makes the choices simple enough. There are four CX-7 models available, ranging from the $21,990 I SV model to our Grand Touring tester. The two lower-end trims can only be had in front-wheel-drive form and each model sports a 2.5-liter four-cylinder with 161 horsepower and a standard five-speed automatic transmission. The Touring and Grand Touring models can be had with either front- or all-wheel drive and the engine of choice is Mazda's turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder mated to a six-speed paddleshift automatic. Our Liquid Silver Metallic Grand Touring tester sported AWD and carried an MSRP of $33,340. That price tag includes just about every accoutrement in the options box, save for a few accessory-type add-ons and second-row DVD navigation, which can be had for an additional $1,200. That means USB and auxiliary inputs, leather seats, moonroof and navigation are all part of the package, leaving exterior and interior color combinations as the only choices to make. We may have ended up with the top CX-7, but every example of Mazda's mid-size CUV starts with the same sharp-looking sheetmetal. Think of it as a Mazda3 on HGH, except instead of growing brows and a massive neck, the CX-7 wears the muscle necessary to pull off the happy face aesthetic better than its smaller sibling. The CX-7 also scores high marks for managing to successfully strut the aggressive wheel arches of sportier fare like the RX-8, giving this CUV a purposeful stance. It helps that those wheel wells are filled with 19-inch alloys wrapped in P235/55R19 rubber. In short, the CX-7 looks like a 65-inch-tall sporty hatchback. And that's not a bad thing. Step inside the CX-7's cabin and that same athletic aesthetic carries forward. The dash is cockpit-like, while the leather-wrapped steering wheel has a race-inspired feel. To fit everything in the dash, Mazda's designers opted for a dual cowl approach, with the top section housing LCD screens that display vehicle information and navigation. Below the data is a dizzying …
Full Review

2011 CX-7 Overview

Is Zoom-Zoom More Important Than Room-Room? 2011 Mazda CX-7 - Click above for high-res image gallery When we think of mid-size crossovers, words like "comfort," "convenience" and "roominess" are the first things to spring to mind. For some CUVs, those are accurate descriptions, but the Mazda CX-7 also has to fulfill a Zoom-Zoom promise. For the past 11 years, Mazda's mantra has meant that driving excitement must be injected into every vehicle it builds, whether it's a roadster like the MX-5 Miata or a minivan like the Mazda5. Athletic handling is a no-brainer for sports cars like the RX-8, but crossover owners typically expect creature comforts, utility and a smooth ride. We've been won over by the CX-7's sporty genes before, but the crossover field is far thicker and more talented than it was back in 2007 when the CX-7 first hit the scene. Does this Mazda softroader still strike the right balance? We spent a week getting reacquainted with 2011 CX-7 Grand Touring to find out. When ordering a CX-7, Mazda makes the choices simple enough. There are four CX-7 models available, ranging from the $21,990 I SV model to our Grand Touring tester. The two lower-end trims can only be had in front-wheel-drive form and each model sports a 2.5-liter four-cylinder with 161 horsepower and a standard five-speed automatic transmission. The Touring and Grand Touring models can be had with either front- or all-wheel drive and the engine of choice is Mazda's turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder mated to a six-speed paddleshift automatic. Our Liquid Silver Metallic Grand Touring tester sported AWD and carried an MSRP of $33,340. That price tag includes just about every accoutrement in the options box, save for a few accessory-type add-ons and second-row DVD navigation, which can be had for an additional $1,200. That means USB and auxiliary inputs, leather seats, moonroof and navigation are all part of the package, leaving exterior and interior color combinations as the only choices to make. We may have ended up with the top CX-7, but every example of Mazda's mid-size CUV starts with the same sharp-looking sheetmetal. Think of it as a Mazda3 on HGH, except instead of growing brows and a massive neck, the CX-7 wears the muscle necessary to pull off the happy face aesthetic better than its smaller sibling. The CX-7 also scores high marks for managing to successfully strut the aggressive wheel arches of sportier fare like the RX-8, giving this CUV a purposeful stance. It helps that those wheel wells are filled with 19-inch alloys wrapped in P235/55R19 rubber. In short, the CX-7 looks like a 65-inch-tall sporty hatchback. And that's not a bad thing. Step inside the CX-7's cabin and that same athletic aesthetic carries forward. The dash is cockpit-like, while the leather-wrapped steering wheel has a race-inspired feel. To fit everything in the dash, Mazda's designers opted for a dual cowl approach, with the top section housing LCD screens that display vehicle information and navigation. Below the data is a dizzying …Hide Full Review