2011 Kia Sportage

MSRP ?

$18,295 - $27,295
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N/A
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Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 29 Hwy
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2011 Sportage Overview

Turbocharging Adds Welcome Spice To This Handsome Soft-Roader 2011 Kia Sportage SX - Click above for high-res image gallery There's no replacement for displacement. Ask any man or woman who dined on the muscle cars that Detroit was serving in the '50s and '60s, and they'll tell you to always order the largest engine offered if you want to have any fun. Thing is, that tired old axiom just isn't accurate in the modern era. Downsizing is what's for dinner these days. Before anyone older than 60 has a heart attack, know that the ever-escalating horsepower wars are alive and well. As it turns out, there is a replacement for displacement: technology. Take one part modern computers and the hundreds of sensors that feed them, add the classic trick of turbocharging and sprinkle on the relatively newfangled mechanical magic of direct injection, and you've got yourself one tasty recipe for performance. And you don't need a cup that measures power in cubic inches to get it. Look no farther for proof than Kia. The Korean automaker is working hard to change its hard-earned image of offering low-cost, basic transportation to something more like the sportier side of a dual-headed Korean conglomerate that also includes Hyundai. Its SX trim level is part of that plan, and the latest two vehicles to bear those letters only have a less-is-more strategy of power production on the menu. We've already sampled the turbocharged, direct-injected Optima SX and were left wanting seconds; now it's time to taste Kia's well-received and attractive compact crossover, the Sportage, in turbo flavor. Continue reading Review: 2011 Kia Sportage SX... %Gallery-120575% Photos copyright ©2011 Jeremy Korzeniewski / AOL Make no mistake, the biggest piece of the Sportage SX pie is its engine. Kia has managed to coax 260 horsepower (at 6,000 rpm) from just 2.0 liters, which is an impressive feat. Torque comes in at an equally impressive 269 pound-feet, delivered between 1,850 and 3,000 rpm. If that's not sounding all that special, consider what would happen if you could linearly double the engine size and output. Does 520 horsepower from 4.0 liters grab your attention? Granted, other automakers have met and even beaten that power-per-liter figure – General Motors reached that exact same level of horsepower with its turbocharged, direct-injected 2.0-liter Ecotec engine over five years ago, albeit with a bit less peak torque. Kia, however, has managed the feat while requiring only regular-grade gasoline. We applaud Kia for not requiring the finest of fuel (in terms of price) at the pump, even more so because we're not being asked to forsake any performance at the altar of 87 octane. We did ask officials on hand at the model's introduction in Phoenix if there would be a performance boost from using premium gasoline, but there isn't. We were told this engine was tuned from the very beginning to drink regular 87 octane, and while its computer system will indeed recognize when higher octane gas goes in the tank, the …
Full Review

2011 Sportage Overview

Turbocharging Adds Welcome Spice To This Handsome Soft-Roader 2011 Kia Sportage SX - Click above for high-res image gallery There's no replacement for displacement. Ask any man or woman who dined on the muscle cars that Detroit was serving in the '50s and '60s, and they'll tell you to always order the largest engine offered if you want to have any fun. Thing is, that tired old axiom just isn't accurate in the modern era. Downsizing is what's for dinner these days. Before anyone older than 60 has a heart attack, know that the ever-escalating horsepower wars are alive and well. As it turns out, there is a replacement for displacement: technology. Take one part modern computers and the hundreds of sensors that feed them, add the classic trick of turbocharging and sprinkle on the relatively newfangled mechanical magic of direct injection, and you've got yourself one tasty recipe for performance. And you don't need a cup that measures power in cubic inches to get it. Look no farther for proof than Kia. The Korean automaker is working hard to change its hard-earned image of offering low-cost, basic transportation to something more like the sportier side of a dual-headed Korean conglomerate that also includes Hyundai. Its SX trim level is part of that plan, and the latest two vehicles to bear those letters only have a less-is-more strategy of power production on the menu. We've already sampled the turbocharged, direct-injected Optima SX and were left wanting seconds; now it's time to taste Kia's well-received and attractive compact crossover, the Sportage, in turbo flavor. Continue reading Review: 2011 Kia Sportage SX... %Gallery-120575% Photos copyright ©2011 Jeremy Korzeniewski / AOL Make no mistake, the biggest piece of the Sportage SX pie is its engine. Kia has managed to coax 260 horsepower (at 6,000 rpm) from just 2.0 liters, which is an impressive feat. Torque comes in at an equally impressive 269 pound-feet, delivered between 1,850 and 3,000 rpm. If that's not sounding all that special, consider what would happen if you could linearly double the engine size and output. Does 520 horsepower from 4.0 liters grab your attention? Granted, other automakers have met and even beaten that power-per-liter figure – General Motors reached that exact same level of horsepower with its turbocharged, direct-injected 2.0-liter Ecotec engine over five years ago, albeit with a bit less peak torque. Kia, however, has managed the feat while requiring only regular-grade gasoline. We applaud Kia for not requiring the finest of fuel (in terms of price) at the pump, even more so because we're not being asked to forsake any performance at the altar of 87 octane. We did ask officials on hand at the model's introduction in Phoenix if there would be a performance boost from using premium gasoline, but there isn't. We were told this engine was tuned from the very beginning to drink regular 87 octane, and while its computer system will indeed recognize when higher octane gas goes in the tank, the …Hide Full Review