XJL 4dr Sedan
2011 Jaguar XJ

MSRP ?

$79,700
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N/A
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Engine Engine 5.0LV-8
MPG MPG 15 City / 22 Hwy
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2011 XJ Overview

Lightweight Luxury with Style 2011 Jaguar XJL - Click above for high-res image gallery There's a sect of motoring nihilists out there who would have us all believe there isn't a single thing in the automotive universe that hasn't been done before. It's the "Simpsons did it" meme on methamphetamines, though instead of a yellow animated family, our cast is populated by the likes of Plymouth, Cord, Studebaker, Hudson and any number of other equally innovative yet forgotten brands. Think adaptive headlights are a trick piece of tech? Think again – Willys-Knight employed a third directional headlight as early as 1928 on its 70A, and Citroën made use of similar methodology on cars like the DS and SM way back when. The XJ is as close to shrugging off the bland, conservative lines of the luxury sedan as you're apt to find. Few segments seem to have accepted this grim reality quite like the luxury sedan world. Automakers that once strove to create unique products now seem to be operating from the same design template. Line up the profiles of the BMW 7 Series, Audi A8 and the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, and the vast majority of the car-buying public would have no idea which car was which. Each vehicle is attractive in its own right, but we wouldn't accuse any of them possessing the same kind of gravitas as, say, a '38 Mercedes-Benz 770. Which is one of the big reasons we're smitten with the 2011 Jaguar XJL. Whereas the only way you're going to stop traffic with a 7 Series is to put the drivers around you to sleep, the newest interpretation of the stately Jaguar flagship is the kind of beauty that sends jaws clattering across the concrete. %Gallery-99680% Photos copyright ©2010 Zach Bowman / AOL The design evolution of the XJ line has been downright glacial since the car first debuted in 1968. With its quad headlights, squared but forward-leaning grille and well-shaped tail, the company's designers realized they penned one of the world's most iconic shapes and left it at that. For nearly 40 years, the car remained always within arm's reach of the original look – swapping headlights here, adding a few more curves there, but never straying too far from what made the XJ, well, an XJ. So when Jaguar announced it had something special planned for 2011, most of us auto journo types expected a revised engine and maybe a few tweaks to the car's exterior, or perhaps a scaled-up XF. What we got instead was something much more special – a clean-slate redesign of one of the world's most easily identifiable sedans. Jaguar started by penning the long-legged XJL first, then subtracted nearly five inches out of the wheelbase to create the standard XJ. That helps to explain why the larger of the two sedans seems so proportional compared to its competition. Typically, designers put pen to paper on the short-wheelbase version before stretching the design for limousine products, but with the XJL …
Full Review

2011 XJ Overview

Lightweight Luxury with Style 2011 Jaguar XJL - Click above for high-res image gallery There's a sect of motoring nihilists out there who would have us all believe there isn't a single thing in the automotive universe that hasn't been done before. It's the "Simpsons did it" meme on methamphetamines, though instead of a yellow animated family, our cast is populated by the likes of Plymouth, Cord, Studebaker, Hudson and any number of other equally innovative yet forgotten brands. Think adaptive headlights are a trick piece of tech? Think again – Willys-Knight employed a third directional headlight as early as 1928 on its 70A, and Citroën made use of similar methodology on cars like the DS and SM way back when. The XJ is as close to shrugging off the bland, conservative lines of the luxury sedan as you're apt to find. Few segments seem to have accepted this grim reality quite like the luxury sedan world. Automakers that once strove to create unique products now seem to be operating from the same design template. Line up the profiles of the BMW 7 Series, Audi A8 and the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, and the vast majority of the car-buying public would have no idea which car was which. Each vehicle is attractive in its own right, but we wouldn't accuse any of them possessing the same kind of gravitas as, say, a '38 Mercedes-Benz 770. Which is one of the big reasons we're smitten with the 2011 Jaguar XJL. Whereas the only way you're going to stop traffic with a 7 Series is to put the drivers around you to sleep, the newest interpretation of the stately Jaguar flagship is the kind of beauty that sends jaws clattering across the concrete. %Gallery-99680% Photos copyright ©2010 Zach Bowman / AOL The design evolution of the XJ line has been downright glacial since the car first debuted in 1968. With its quad headlights, squared but forward-leaning grille and well-shaped tail, the company's designers realized they penned one of the world's most iconic shapes and left it at that. For nearly 40 years, the car remained always within arm's reach of the original look – swapping headlights here, adding a few more curves there, but never straying too far from what made the XJ, well, an XJ. So when Jaguar announced it had something special planned for 2011, most of us auto journo types expected a revised engine and maybe a few tweaks to the car's exterior, or perhaps a scaled-up XF. What we got instead was something much more special – a clean-slate redesign of one of the world's most easily identifiable sedans. Jaguar started by penning the long-legged XJL first, then subtracted nearly five inches out of the wheelbase to create the standard XJ. That helps to explain why the larger of the two sedans seems so proportional compared to its competition. Typically, designers put pen to paper on the short-wheelbase version before stretching the design for limousine products, but with the XJL …Hide Full Review