Heat 4dr All-wheel Drive
2011 Dodge Durango

MSRP ?

$32,520
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Engine Engine 3.6LV-6
MPG MPG 16 City / 22 Hwy
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2011 Durango Overview

Finding Redemption Through Repetition, Groundhog Day Style 2011 Dodge Durango - Click above for high-res image gallery Two years ago, on a lark, my girlfriend and I clambered aboard a new Dodge Durango Hybrid and motored from Detroit to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania to take in the kitschy phenomenon known as Groundhog Day. The idea was to do a combined road trip story and vehicle review, but Chrysler didn't even wait for us to return home before it killed off production of the gas-electric SUV. In fact, it wasn't much more than two months after its initial announcement that production was cancelled at the truck's Delaware plant. Blame Chrysler's then-dire financial condition, but the hybrid Durango barely made a dent on the Pentastar's production charts, lasting one model year and moving just 224 copies. Hold your belated "Who Killed the Electric SUV?" shrieks, though. Despite a nearly 25-percent increase in claimed fuel efficiency, the Durango Hybrid wasn't a particularly good vehicle. This wasn't really its fault, of course, as the already aging second-generation Durango upon which it was based wasn't a terribly refined piece to begin with. Fast-forward to 2011, and we've commandeered an example of Dodge's all-new third-generation Durango to make our second-ever pilgrimage to see Punxy Phil. More importantly, we're using the trip as an opportunity to see if Chrysler has finally gotten around to building a better Durango. Continue reading Review: 2011 Dodge Durango... %Gallery-117271% Photos copyright ©2011 Chris Paukert / AOL In a bit of real life imitates Hollywood art, hitting the rewind button on our Durango-to-Punxsy trip echoes the journey of Pittsburgh weatherman Phil Connors in the movie Groundhog Day. In the 1993 Harold Ramis cult classic, a self-absorbed meteorologist played by Bill Murray is trapped in the Pennsylvania hamlet on February 2, doomed to relive the same small town celebration over and over again until he gets it right. In his journey of self-discovery, Connors goes through periods of seemingly consequence-free indulgence, intense learning and suicidal depressions before making a concerted effort to better himself. Coincidentally, Chrysler itself has also been locked in its own Groundhog Day-like boom/bust cycle of product development for decades, perpetually embarking on periods of inspired design and innovation, only to relapse into the familiar, easy malaise of building bland and technologically moribund vehicles until it's once again near death. The Pentastar has made something of an art out of producing its best work on the brink of financial Armageddon, a pattern it has been repeating since the original Chrysler minivan. In what is hopefully its final bout of rope-a-dope automaking, Chrysler has rebounded from bankruptcy in 2009 to deliver this new Durango and the excellent Jeep Grand Cherokee, along with the promising new 300 and Charger sedans. Like its post-bankruptcy parents at Chrysler, the 2011 Durango has emerged a significantly different and altogether leaner and meaner mid-size proposition than its predecessor. Its sleek new sheetmetal now covers a unibody architecture cut from the same cloth as the Grand Cherokee, only this …
Full Review

2011 Durango Overview

Finding Redemption Through Repetition, Groundhog Day Style 2011 Dodge Durango - Click above for high-res image gallery Two years ago, on a lark, my girlfriend and I clambered aboard a new Dodge Durango Hybrid and motored from Detroit to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania to take in the kitschy phenomenon known as Groundhog Day. The idea was to do a combined road trip story and vehicle review, but Chrysler didn't even wait for us to return home before it killed off production of the gas-electric SUV. In fact, it wasn't much more than two months after its initial announcement that production was cancelled at the truck's Delaware plant. Blame Chrysler's then-dire financial condition, but the hybrid Durango barely made a dent on the Pentastar's production charts, lasting one model year and moving just 224 copies. Hold your belated "Who Killed the Electric SUV?" shrieks, though. Despite a nearly 25-percent increase in claimed fuel efficiency, the Durango Hybrid wasn't a particularly good vehicle. This wasn't really its fault, of course, as the already aging second-generation Durango upon which it was based wasn't a terribly refined piece to begin with. Fast-forward to 2011, and we've commandeered an example of Dodge's all-new third-generation Durango to make our second-ever pilgrimage to see Punxy Phil. More importantly, we're using the trip as an opportunity to see if Chrysler has finally gotten around to building a better Durango. Continue reading Review: 2011 Dodge Durango... %Gallery-117271% Photos copyright ©2011 Chris Paukert / AOL In a bit of real life imitates Hollywood art, hitting the rewind button on our Durango-to-Punxsy trip echoes the journey of Pittsburgh weatherman Phil Connors in the movie Groundhog Day. In the 1993 Harold Ramis cult classic, a self-absorbed meteorologist played by Bill Murray is trapped in the Pennsylvania hamlet on February 2, doomed to relive the same small town celebration over and over again until he gets it right. In his journey of self-discovery, Connors goes through periods of seemingly consequence-free indulgence, intense learning and suicidal depressions before making a concerted effort to better himself. Coincidentally, Chrysler itself has also been locked in its own Groundhog Day-like boom/bust cycle of product development for decades, perpetually embarking on periods of inspired design and innovation, only to relapse into the familiar, easy malaise of building bland and technologically moribund vehicles until it's once again near death. The Pentastar has made something of an art out of producing its best work on the brink of financial Armageddon, a pattern it has been repeating since the original Chrysler minivan. In what is hopefully its final bout of rope-a-dope automaking, Chrysler has rebounded from bankruptcy in 2009 to deliver this new Durango and the excellent Jeep Grand Cherokee, along with the promising new 300 and Charger sedans. Like its post-bankruptcy parents at Chrysler, the 2011 Durango has emerged a significantly different and altogether leaner and meaner mid-size proposition than its predecessor. Its sleek new sheetmetal now covers a unibody architecture cut from the same cloth as the Grand Cherokee, only this …Hide Full Review