2011 Dodge Caliber

MSRP ?

$17,380 - $20,585
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG MPG 24 City / 32 Hwy
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2011 Caliber Overview

A Monument To Mediocrity We didn't exactly get off on the right foot with the Dodge Caliber. As the spiritual successor to the profitable and successful Dodge Neon, this boxy hatch had big expectations to meet when it touched down way back in 2006. Unfortunately, the Caliber never found itself in the same room as those expectations. But it was crafted during the dark days before Chrysler's fall, and the company has recently made great strides in shoring up its product line. Nearly every vehicle in the Dodge and Chrysler stable, as well as few pieces from the houses of Ram and Jeep, have gone under the knife and come out all the better, but the lowly Caliber has largely escaped revision. Facing new competition from vehicles like the revised Honda Civic, all-new Hyundai Elantra, Chevrolet Cruze and fresh Ford Focus, the Caliber is awash in a sea of excellent options. We took to the wheel to find out if the compact from Dodge has enough life left to keep its head above water until a replacement arrives. The Caliber hasn't received many updates in the five years it's been on the market, and so it brings a familiar face to the road. The handsome split-crosshair grille of the Durango and Charger hasn't trickled down to this five-door just yet, so buyers are left with the old single-crosshair design backed by a series of stacked vertical slats. Squared-off headlight housings and a bulky lower fascia cap off the nose, while wide fenders and a raised hood transition into the vehicle's flanks. The Caliber has always had an odd stance thanks to its CUV ride height and minivan-inspired roof line. Those traits continue on for 2011, as do a set of exaggerated fender arches. Our Heat tester came equipped with some stylish standard 18-inch alloy wheels, which did much for the overall appearance. Unfortunately, an awkward C-pillar and the plastic roof rails that span the entire length of the cabin don't do the exterior any favors. Around back, the Caliber is a study in hard edges with protruding tail lamp housings, a recessed hatch and a squared rear valance. The view is certainly beginning to show its age. Indoors, the cabin has held up well, mostly because it's newer than the rest of the car. While the dash is all hard plastic, the center stack is trimmed with a bias toward the driver's side and controls for the climate system and stereo are easy to access. On the whole, the package looks nice. Unfortunately, the cubby located just north of the shifter gate isn't as deep or large as we'd like. Storing a phone and a music player or a phone and sunglasses is an exercise in figuring out which accessory gets to ride in the cup holder. The small bin wouldn't confront us so much were it not for the unforgivable center arm rest. While the fact this piece can be adjusted front or back is nice, it's hewn from …
Full Review

2011 Caliber Overview

A Monument To Mediocrity We didn't exactly get off on the right foot with the Dodge Caliber. As the spiritual successor to the profitable and successful Dodge Neon, this boxy hatch had big expectations to meet when it touched down way back in 2006. Unfortunately, the Caliber never found itself in the same room as those expectations. But it was crafted during the dark days before Chrysler's fall, and the company has recently made great strides in shoring up its product line. Nearly every vehicle in the Dodge and Chrysler stable, as well as few pieces from the houses of Ram and Jeep, have gone under the knife and come out all the better, but the lowly Caliber has largely escaped revision. Facing new competition from vehicles like the revised Honda Civic, all-new Hyundai Elantra, Chevrolet Cruze and fresh Ford Focus, the Caliber is awash in a sea of excellent options. We took to the wheel to find out if the compact from Dodge has enough life left to keep its head above water until a replacement arrives. The Caliber hasn't received many updates in the five years it's been on the market, and so it brings a familiar face to the road. The handsome split-crosshair grille of the Durango and Charger hasn't trickled down to this five-door just yet, so buyers are left with the old single-crosshair design backed by a series of stacked vertical slats. Squared-off headlight housings and a bulky lower fascia cap off the nose, while wide fenders and a raised hood transition into the vehicle's flanks. The Caliber has always had an odd stance thanks to its CUV ride height and minivan-inspired roof line. Those traits continue on for 2011, as do a set of exaggerated fender arches. Our Heat tester came equipped with some stylish standard 18-inch alloy wheels, which did much for the overall appearance. Unfortunately, an awkward C-pillar and the plastic roof rails that span the entire length of the cabin don't do the exterior any favors. Around back, the Caliber is a study in hard edges with protruding tail lamp housings, a recessed hatch and a squared rear valance. The view is certainly beginning to show its age. Indoors, the cabin has held up well, mostly because it's newer than the rest of the car. While the dash is all hard plastic, the center stack is trimmed with a bias toward the driver's side and controls for the climate system and stereo are easy to access. On the whole, the package looks nice. Unfortunately, the cubby located just north of the shifter gate isn't as deep or large as we'd like. Storing a phone and a music player or a phone and sunglasses is an exercise in figuring out which accessory gets to ride in the cup holder. The small bin wouldn't confront us so much were it not for the unforgivable center arm rest. While the fact this piece can be adjusted front or back is nice, it's hewn from …Hide Full Review