Base 4dr All-wheel Drive Sedan
2011 Chrysler 300C

MSRP ?

$40,320
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 5.7LV-8
MPG MPG 15 City / 23 Hwy
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2011 300C Overview

The Big American Sedan Is Alive And Well 2011 Chrysler 300 - Click above for high-res image gallery Of the many hurtful similes one can hurl at a vehicle, few are more insidious than drawing design or driving parallels to the oft-maligned American sedan. Thanks to the dark days of the '70s and '80s, once proud nameplates like Imperial, Impala and Galaxie were either completely forgotten or bastardized into models with about as much personality as a tube sock. Whether you blame it on oil prices, safety standards or the popularity of disco and cocaine, there's no denying that the domestic four-door suffered a major fall from grace. Now, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler are all fighting tooth and nail to establish their products as capable of besting metal from Japan, Germany and Korea. While that's largely translated into a fleet of mid-sized sedans with soap-bar aesthetics and front-wheel-drive architectures, the 2011 Chrysler 300 is hell-bent on continuing to buck that trend. With its rear-wheel-drive configuration and stylish lines, the four-door strives to draw connections to the Pentastar's more successful past – to an era long before corporate take-overs and the K-car. Is it successful? Continue reading Review: 2011 Chrysler 300... %Gallery-121468% Photos copyright ©2011 Zach Bowman / AOL When the 300 first bowed in 2005, it brought a new-found element of menacing appeal to the full-size segment thanks to its high shoulder line, chopped roof and vertical grille. The design may have borrowed more than a few cues from the Bentley stable, but buyers were more than happy to embrace the high-dollar association. For 2011, Chrysler insists the 300 is all-new from tires to taillights, though much of that same look has held on for the new generation. The company's designers have given the big beast a more mature nose with LED-trimmed projection headlamps, touches of chrome and a more subdued grille. From the profile view, it's difficult to discern the new-generation 300 from its predecessor, though careful examination will reveal more pronounced fender arches fore and aft, as well as new detailing behind the rear wheel. The tail of the sedan has received much more aggressive updating, with a new valance that integrates smoothly into the upper and lower portions of the 300's posterior, allowing for muscular-looking exhaust outlets – even on our V6 tester. The LED taillights are both bright and beautiful at night, and although we don't mind the chrome detailing on the lamps themselves, the shiny trim along the trunk sill is a bit much. While the 2011 Chrysler 300 may still wear its older sibling's hand-me-down skirt outside, its cockpit has benefited fully from the Pentastar's interior renaissance. A single piece, soft-touch dash stretches between both A-pillars and integrates flawlessly with the front door panels. Compared to the clunky center stack and cheap plastics of the old machine, the new cabin has been improved by several orders of magnitude. The centerpiece of the dash is the same 8.4-inch LCD touchscreen interface found elsewhere in …
Full Review

2011 300C Overview

The Big American Sedan Is Alive And Well 2011 Chrysler 300 - Click above for high-res image gallery Of the many hurtful similes one can hurl at a vehicle, few are more insidious than drawing design or driving parallels to the oft-maligned American sedan. Thanks to the dark days of the '70s and '80s, once proud nameplates like Imperial, Impala and Galaxie were either completely forgotten or bastardized into models with about as much personality as a tube sock. Whether you blame it on oil prices, safety standards or the popularity of disco and cocaine, there's no denying that the domestic four-door suffered a major fall from grace. Now, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler are all fighting tooth and nail to establish their products as capable of besting metal from Japan, Germany and Korea. While that's largely translated into a fleet of mid-sized sedans with soap-bar aesthetics and front-wheel-drive architectures, the 2011 Chrysler 300 is hell-bent on continuing to buck that trend. With its rear-wheel-drive configuration and stylish lines, the four-door strives to draw connections to the Pentastar's more successful past – to an era long before corporate take-overs and the K-car. Is it successful? Continue reading Review: 2011 Chrysler 300... %Gallery-121468% Photos copyright ©2011 Zach Bowman / AOL When the 300 first bowed in 2005, it brought a new-found element of menacing appeal to the full-size segment thanks to its high shoulder line, chopped roof and vertical grille. The design may have borrowed more than a few cues from the Bentley stable, but buyers were more than happy to embrace the high-dollar association. For 2011, Chrysler insists the 300 is all-new from tires to taillights, though much of that same look has held on for the new generation. The company's designers have given the big beast a more mature nose with LED-trimmed projection headlamps, touches of chrome and a more subdued grille. From the profile view, it's difficult to discern the new-generation 300 from its predecessor, though careful examination will reveal more pronounced fender arches fore and aft, as well as new detailing behind the rear wheel. The tail of the sedan has received much more aggressive updating, with a new valance that integrates smoothly into the upper and lower portions of the 300's posterior, allowing for muscular-looking exhaust outlets – even on our V6 tester. The LED taillights are both bright and beautiful at night, and although we don't mind the chrome detailing on the lamps themselves, the shiny trim along the trunk sill is a bit much. While the 2011 Chrysler 300 may still wear its older sibling's hand-me-down skirt outside, its cockpit has benefited fully from the Pentastar's interior renaissance. A single piece, soft-touch dash stretches between both A-pillars and integrates flawlessly with the front door panels. Compared to the clunky center stack and cheap plastics of the old machine, the new cabin has been improved by several orders of magnitude. The centerpiece of the dash is the same 8.4-inch LCD touchscreen interface found elsewhere in …Hide Full Review