IV 5dr Hatchback
2010 Toyota Prius

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$26,600
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Engine Engine I-4
MPG MPG 51 City / 48 Hwy
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2010 Prius Overview

2010 Plug-in Prius Prototypes – Click above for high-res image gallery It's been two-and-a-half years since we last got behind the wheel of a plug-in Toyota Prius. The name is the same, but today's plug-in Prius is a totally different vehicle, and it was high time to see what changes Toyota has made to their plug-in hybrid (PHEV) in its ongoing effort to slowly get the car ready for the U.S. market. Back in late 2007, the prototype had a NiMH battery pack and the converted vehicle was based on the second-generation model. The new fleet of PHEV Priuses in San Diego this week as part of Toyota's Sustainable Mobility Seminar are converted 2010 third-generation models, featuring upgraded lithium-ion packs. Toyota has brought the PHEV Prius fleet to the U.S. to begin a two-year test and monitoring period. The vehicles are equipped with transmitters from Qualcomm that record not only driver behavior, but also how often the car is plugged in. We'll have more information soon with technical details about the mules and an explanation of Toyota's plans to test and sell the long-awaited plug-in hatchback for 2012. But before then, we wanted to grab some seat time. The short version is that driving a plug-in Prius is almost exactly like driving a standard one, except that it remains quieter for a longer period as the engine is off more often (during short distances) thanks to a larger battery pack and improved all-electric performance. Acceleration, handling, braking – everything feels awfully familiar. Make the jump to find out more, including how you can now go up to 64 mph without using a single drop of fuel. %Gallery-90367% Photos by Sebastian Blanco / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Sixty-four mph was the highest speed we managed to achieve while staying in pure EV mode, and it turns out that most of our two, 10-mile loops were completed using battery power (we managed 70 percent on the highway loop, then 83 percent on the city loop when we started with a full pack). The newest PHEV Priuses have a maximum all-electric range of around 13-14 miles, compared to the seven miles in the plug-in version of the second-gen Prius. In the new models, driving on all-electric power is indicated by a green car image that says "EV" in the driver information screen (see below). If the engine kicks in, then this picture turns to a simple, empty outline. This is useful, because when you're traveling at highway speeds, you can't always tell when the engine turns on. When you're driving in quiet locations, then the engine is noticeable, but other than that, the EV light is your only signal that you've moved from electrons to dead dino-juice. This all reinforces the impression that the new plug-in Prius is just a more advanced version of the regular car you can buy today. You start the car the same way (but now the button is a nice blue color) and shift and steer just …
Full Review

2010 Prius Overview

2010 Plug-in Prius Prototypes – Click above for high-res image gallery It's been two-and-a-half years since we last got behind the wheel of a plug-in Toyota Prius. The name is the same, but today's plug-in Prius is a totally different vehicle, and it was high time to see what changes Toyota has made to their plug-in hybrid (PHEV) in its ongoing effort to slowly get the car ready for the U.S. market. Back in late 2007, the prototype had a NiMH battery pack and the converted vehicle was based on the second-generation model. The new fleet of PHEV Priuses in San Diego this week as part of Toyota's Sustainable Mobility Seminar are converted 2010 third-generation models, featuring upgraded lithium-ion packs. Toyota has brought the PHEV Prius fleet to the U.S. to begin a two-year test and monitoring period. The vehicles are equipped with transmitters from Qualcomm that record not only driver behavior, but also how often the car is plugged in. We'll have more information soon with technical details about the mules and an explanation of Toyota's plans to test and sell the long-awaited plug-in hatchback for 2012. But before then, we wanted to grab some seat time. The short version is that driving a plug-in Prius is almost exactly like driving a standard one, except that it remains quieter for a longer period as the engine is off more often (during short distances) thanks to a larger battery pack and improved all-electric performance. Acceleration, handling, braking – everything feels awfully familiar. Make the jump to find out more, including how you can now go up to 64 mph without using a single drop of fuel. %Gallery-90367% Photos by Sebastian Blanco / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Sixty-four mph was the highest speed we managed to achieve while staying in pure EV mode, and it turns out that most of our two, 10-mile loops were completed using battery power (we managed 70 percent on the highway loop, then 83 percent on the city loop when we started with a full pack). The newest PHEV Priuses have a maximum all-electric range of around 13-14 miles, compared to the seven miles in the plug-in version of the second-gen Prius. In the new models, driving on all-electric power is indicated by a green car image that says "EV" in the driver information screen (see below). If the engine kicks in, then this picture turns to a simple, empty outline. This is useful, because when you're traveling at highway speeds, you can't always tell when the engine turns on. When you're driving in quiet locations, then the engine is noticeable, but other than that, the EV light is your only signal that you've moved from electrons to dead dino-juice. This all reinforces the impression that the new plug-in Prius is just a more advanced version of the regular car you can buy today. You start the car the same way (but now the button is a nice blue color) and shift and steer just …Hide Full Review