2010 Subaru Outback

MSRP ?

$22,995 - $30,995
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N/A
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Engine Engine 2.5LH-4
MPG MPG 19 City / 27 Hwy
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2010 Outback Overview

2010 Subaru Outback - Click above for high-res image gallery Even in the face of a bleak economy and dreadful auto sales, Subaru managed to have a breakout year in 2009. Products like the Forester and the Impreza helped Subaru achieve consistent year-over-year gains while the Japanese automaker continues to post stellar quality ratings through J.D. Power and Consumer Reports. And the accolades don't stop there. The new-for-2009 Forester was crowned the 2008 Motor Trend SUV of the year, and this year Subaru accomplished a surprise repeat taking the award for the second straight year with the 2010 Outback. However, the new Outback isn't the capable, milquetoast lifted station wagon we've come to know and respect over the years. It's now bigger. Quite a bit bigger, performing a similar wagon-to-crossover transformation that the Forester pulled off a year earlier. Granted, the Outback is only two inches taller and wider, and a mere three inches longer between the wheels, but the result is a wagon that looks much larger than the model it replaces. We've come to expect that kind of growth in a world of constant size and weight one-upping, but we had to wonder – has increased functionality come at the expense of entertainment once again? We snagged a six-cylinder Outback to find out. %Gallery-80727% Photos by Chris Shunk / Copyright ©2009 Weblogs, Inc. In 3.6R Limited trim, the story starts with a great powertrain and gets better from there. Subaru's 3.6-liter boxer six-cylinder pumps out a worthy 256 horsepower and 247 pound-feet of torque. This admittedly doesn't sound all that spectacular when 269-hp Toyota RAV4s and 290-hp Buick Enclaves roam the landscape. But the boxer six feels beefier than the sum of its numbers primarily because power delivery is so fluid and consistent. The engine is mated to a five-speed automatic that plays well with its six-pot partner, and while Subaru provides paddle shifters to row your own gears, the smooth, well-timed cogswaps of the auto 'box negates the need. Despite its upgraded proportions, Subaru engineers worked hard to keep weight down. Our loaded Outback 3.6R Limited tester weighed in at just over 3,600 pounds – some 400 pounds lighter than a comparably equipped Toyota Venza with all-wheel drive, one of the Outback's main competitors. Subaru was able to keep the pounds down through the use of high strength steel, making the structure both safer and lighter than a more rotund CUV. The Outback's relatively restrained tonnage helps the boxer six feel that much more potent when pushed, and the weight reduction pays dividends in the braking department, allowing the Outback to be halted with minimal fuss on wet or dry pavement. But while the 3.6-liter boxer is good, it's the symmetrical all-wheel drive that wins the day. We put the Outback through its paces on dry pavement, through a torrential downpour and some muddy terrain and were always well within the limits of adhesion. In fact, the Outback's seemingly never-ending traction begged us to drive harder …
Full Review

2010 Outback Overview

2010 Subaru Outback - Click above for high-res image gallery Even in the face of a bleak economy and dreadful auto sales, Subaru managed to have a breakout year in 2009. Products like the Forester and the Impreza helped Subaru achieve consistent year-over-year gains while the Japanese automaker continues to post stellar quality ratings through J.D. Power and Consumer Reports. And the accolades don't stop there. The new-for-2009 Forester was crowned the 2008 Motor Trend SUV of the year, and this year Subaru accomplished a surprise repeat taking the award for the second straight year with the 2010 Outback. However, the new Outback isn't the capable, milquetoast lifted station wagon we've come to know and respect over the years. It's now bigger. Quite a bit bigger, performing a similar wagon-to-crossover transformation that the Forester pulled off a year earlier. Granted, the Outback is only two inches taller and wider, and a mere three inches longer between the wheels, but the result is a wagon that looks much larger than the model it replaces. We've come to expect that kind of growth in a world of constant size and weight one-upping, but we had to wonder – has increased functionality come at the expense of entertainment once again? We snagged a six-cylinder Outback to find out. %Gallery-80727% Photos by Chris Shunk / Copyright ©2009 Weblogs, Inc. In 3.6R Limited trim, the story starts with a great powertrain and gets better from there. Subaru's 3.6-liter boxer six-cylinder pumps out a worthy 256 horsepower and 247 pound-feet of torque. This admittedly doesn't sound all that spectacular when 269-hp Toyota RAV4s and 290-hp Buick Enclaves roam the landscape. But the boxer six feels beefier than the sum of its numbers primarily because power delivery is so fluid and consistent. The engine is mated to a five-speed automatic that plays well with its six-pot partner, and while Subaru provides paddle shifters to row your own gears, the smooth, well-timed cogswaps of the auto 'box negates the need. Despite its upgraded proportions, Subaru engineers worked hard to keep weight down. Our loaded Outback 3.6R Limited tester weighed in at just over 3,600 pounds – some 400 pounds lighter than a comparably equipped Toyota Venza with all-wheel drive, one of the Outback's main competitors. Subaru was able to keep the pounds down through the use of high strength steel, making the structure both safer and lighter than a more rotund CUV. The Outback's relatively restrained tonnage helps the boxer six feel that much more potent when pushed, and the weight reduction pays dividends in the braking department, allowing the Outback to be halted with minimal fuss on wet or dry pavement. But while the 3.6-liter boxer is good, it's the symmetrical all-wheel drive that wins the day. We put the Outback through its paces on dry pavement, through a torrential downpour and some muddy terrain and were always well within the limits of adhesion. In fact, the Outback's seemingly never-ending traction begged us to drive harder …Hide Full Review