2.5i 4dr Sedan
2010 Subaru Legacy

MSRP ?

$19,995
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
Hassle Free Quote
Engine Engine 2.5LH-4
MPG MPG 19 City / 27 Hwy
More More View All Specs

2010 Legacy Overview

2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5GT – Click above for high-res image gallery For one reason or another, we've always thought that if you delved deep enough into the history of Subaru, you'd discover the Japanese automaker is, in fact, Swedish. One can imagine rifling through the company's dusty archives, only to discover that at some point in time, through some quirk of fate – or perhaps a common love of fish – Subaru was born in Scandinavia, yet it ended up turning Japanese (I really think so). Just look at the evidence: Quirky styling? Check. Steadfast adherence to left-field drivetrains? Check. Time-honored emphasis on honest utility? Check. Willfully different clientele base? Check. Good in winter? Uh-huh. Sound like any Swedish automakers we know? There's one key difference between the Nipponese automaker and its kindred spirits over at Saab and Volvo, and it's a biggie: Subaru is making money, and they're picking up share. Year-to-date, Subie has lost just 1.8% of its sales year-over-year in America's wretched, turd-down-the-toilet economy. In this "flat is the new up" market, that's a stellar performance – far better than any other mainline automaker, including current industry darlings Hyundai/Kia. And after a day's drive in the firm's new-for-2010 Legacy, we think they're poised for even greater success. Follow the jump to find out why. %Gallery-66996% Photos Copyright ©2008 Chris Paukert / Weblogs, Inc. 2009 marks the 20th year of Subaru's Legacy lineup, and in a happy bit of self-gifting, the boys and gals at Fuji Heavy Industries (FHI) have popped out this brand-spanking new fifth-generation model. As is the way these days, the all-wheel drive sedan has grown in all dimensions. Use of a new platform ensures that the new car is 1.4-inches longer (to 186.4), 3.6-inches wider (to 71.7), and 3.2-inches taller (59.3) than the exiting model. Overall length may have only grown fractionally, but the wheelbase has swollen by 3.2 inches, prioritizing additional space in the passenger compartment. One might reasonably fear that the Legacy has picked up a whole mess of additional poundage in the embiggening process. Not so. According to Subaru, the base car weighs 3,270 pounds, and all models are no more than 65 pounds heavier than their 2009 counterparts – an eminently reasonable trade-off for a massive increase in interior room and superior content levels. Outside, the 2010 model is much more assertive than the outgoing car, which itself was a bit of a shrinking violet. After the departure of designer Andreas Zapatinas and his Edselian B9 Tribeca, the Pleiades brand seemed to lose a bit of its design nerve and the will to create a unified corporate face. But now, it finally seems to be seeking out its mojo once again with this new Legacy. We're not entirely sure this is a good thing, as the Legacy has gone from understated confidence to a jumble of incomplete ideas (Chrysler Sebring hawkeye headlamps, chrome-happy "wing" grille, hulking flared fenders to emphasize the car's all-wheel drive) that fail to live in …
Full Review

2010 Legacy Overview

2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5GT – Click above for high-res image gallery For one reason or another, we've always thought that if you delved deep enough into the history of Subaru, you'd discover the Japanese automaker is, in fact, Swedish. One can imagine rifling through the company's dusty archives, only to discover that at some point in time, through some quirk of fate – or perhaps a common love of fish – Subaru was born in Scandinavia, yet it ended up turning Japanese (I really think so). Just look at the evidence: Quirky styling? Check. Steadfast adherence to left-field drivetrains? Check. Time-honored emphasis on honest utility? Check. Willfully different clientele base? Check. Good in winter? Uh-huh. Sound like any Swedish automakers we know? There's one key difference between the Nipponese automaker and its kindred spirits over at Saab and Volvo, and it's a biggie: Subaru is making money, and they're picking up share. Year-to-date, Subie has lost just 1.8% of its sales year-over-year in America's wretched, turd-down-the-toilet economy. In this "flat is the new up" market, that's a stellar performance – far better than any other mainline automaker, including current industry darlings Hyundai/Kia. And after a day's drive in the firm's new-for-2010 Legacy, we think they're poised for even greater success. Follow the jump to find out why. %Gallery-66996% Photos Copyright ©2008 Chris Paukert / Weblogs, Inc. 2009 marks the 20th year of Subaru's Legacy lineup, and in a happy bit of self-gifting, the boys and gals at Fuji Heavy Industries (FHI) have popped out this brand-spanking new fifth-generation model. As is the way these days, the all-wheel drive sedan has grown in all dimensions. Use of a new platform ensures that the new car is 1.4-inches longer (to 186.4), 3.6-inches wider (to 71.7), and 3.2-inches taller (59.3) than the exiting model. Overall length may have only grown fractionally, but the wheelbase has swollen by 3.2 inches, prioritizing additional space in the passenger compartment. One might reasonably fear that the Legacy has picked up a whole mess of additional poundage in the embiggening process. Not so. According to Subaru, the base car weighs 3,270 pounds, and all models are no more than 65 pounds heavier than their 2009 counterparts – an eminently reasonable trade-off for a massive increase in interior room and superior content levels. Outside, the 2010 model is much more assertive than the outgoing car, which itself was a bit of a shrinking violet. After the departure of designer Andreas Zapatinas and his Edselian B9 Tribeca, the Pleiades brand seemed to lose a bit of its design nerve and the will to create a unified corporate face. But now, it finally seems to be seeking out its mojo once again with this new Legacy. We're not entirely sure this is a good thing, as the Legacy has gone from understated confidence to a jumble of incomplete ideas (Chrysler Sebring hawkeye headlamps, chrome-happy "wing" grille, hulking flared fenders to emphasize the car's all-wheel drive) that fail to live in …Hide Full Review