2010 Porsche Cayenne

MSRP ?

$45,500 - $126,300
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Engine Engine 3.6LV-6
MPG MPG 14 City / 20 Hwy
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2010 Cayenne Overview

Porsche Cayenne Diesel - Click above for high-res image gallery Porsche sells no fewer than seven different Cayenne models in the U.S. All share the same unibody platform and permanent all-wheel drive system, but each is differentiated by its powerplant, brakes, suspension, and accessory list. Whether you are a blasé soccer mom or an exec hell-bent on embarrassing the dude in the sports car at the traffic light, if you're willing to write the check, Porsche has a Cayenne model with your name on it. The selection is generous, but there is something missing from the mix. As of right now, all North American-bound models have an appetite for premium unleaded fuel. With the price of high-test wavering on the expensive side, Porsche has been diligently engineering hybrid and diesel-powered Cayenne models to significantly reduce pain at the pump. While the automaker has announced the sale of Hybrid Cayenne next year, it's on the fence about offering the diesel model on this side of the Atlantic. Proudly showing off its latest wares, and teasing us with what we can't have, Porsche let us sample a Euro-spec Cayenne Diesel model... on our own turf. %Gallery-73756% Visually, you'd lose all bets trying to distinguish a gasoline-fed Cayenne from a diesel-burning model - they're virtually identical to each other. Furthermore, Porsche doesn't go out of its way to slap any special badges, cladding, or eco-friendly identifier on this model. In the flesh, the diesel variant is a carbon copy of its petrol-burning V6 sibling. However, pop the hood and it's a different story. Nestled between the front wheels is a turbodiesel V6. Although Porsche doesn't try to conceal its origins, there's no shame in admitting the engine is a slightly re-tuned derivate of the excellent (and very clean-burning) VW-Audi Group powerplant shared with the Volkswagen Touareg TDI and Audi Q7 TDI. Displacing 3.0-liters, the Cayenne's V6 utilizes a cast iron block and aluminum cylinder heads. The four-valve engine utilizes the latest in precision fuel transfer with common-rail fuel delivery and direct piezo-injection (at pressures approaching 29,000 psi). Forcing air into the engine is a single variable-vane turbocharger, mated to twin intercoolers. With a compression ratio of 16.8:1, and a 4,800 RPM redline, the engine is rated at 240 horsepower at 4,000 RPM. But we all know that's not what diesels are about. Driveshaft wrenching, pavement annihilating torque is where it's at, and on that front, the six-cylinder delivers. A maximum of 405 pound-feet is available from 2,000-2,250 rpm, with grunt being sent through an electronically-controlled six-speed automatic transmission before making its way to a permanent all-wheel drive system with a standard rear-biased torque split of 38:62 (front-to-rear). The other mechanicals hidden beneath the sheet metal are typical Cayenne fare, including an independent sport-tuned front and rear suspension, generous six-piston monobloc front and four-piston monobloc rear brakes, and five different available wheel/tire combos (our test vehicle was wearing 19-inch wheels wrapped in 275/45R19 rubber). Ready to roll, the whole package tips the scales …
Full Review

2010 Cayenne Overview

Porsche Cayenne Diesel - Click above for high-res image gallery Porsche sells no fewer than seven different Cayenne models in the U.S. All share the same unibody platform and permanent all-wheel drive system, but each is differentiated by its powerplant, brakes, suspension, and accessory list. Whether you are a blasé soccer mom or an exec hell-bent on embarrassing the dude in the sports car at the traffic light, if you're willing to write the check, Porsche has a Cayenne model with your name on it. The selection is generous, but there is something missing from the mix. As of right now, all North American-bound models have an appetite for premium unleaded fuel. With the price of high-test wavering on the expensive side, Porsche has been diligently engineering hybrid and diesel-powered Cayenne models to significantly reduce pain at the pump. While the automaker has announced the sale of Hybrid Cayenne next year, it's on the fence about offering the diesel model on this side of the Atlantic. Proudly showing off its latest wares, and teasing us with what we can't have, Porsche let us sample a Euro-spec Cayenne Diesel model... on our own turf. %Gallery-73756% Visually, you'd lose all bets trying to distinguish a gasoline-fed Cayenne from a diesel-burning model - they're virtually identical to each other. Furthermore, Porsche doesn't go out of its way to slap any special badges, cladding, or eco-friendly identifier on this model. In the flesh, the diesel variant is a carbon copy of its petrol-burning V6 sibling. However, pop the hood and it's a different story. Nestled between the front wheels is a turbodiesel V6. Although Porsche doesn't try to conceal its origins, there's no shame in admitting the engine is a slightly re-tuned derivate of the excellent (and very clean-burning) VW-Audi Group powerplant shared with the Volkswagen Touareg TDI and Audi Q7 TDI. Displacing 3.0-liters, the Cayenne's V6 utilizes a cast iron block and aluminum cylinder heads. The four-valve engine utilizes the latest in precision fuel transfer with common-rail fuel delivery and direct piezo-injection (at pressures approaching 29,000 psi). Forcing air into the engine is a single variable-vane turbocharger, mated to twin intercoolers. With a compression ratio of 16.8:1, and a 4,800 RPM redline, the engine is rated at 240 horsepower at 4,000 RPM. But we all know that's not what diesels are about. Driveshaft wrenching, pavement annihilating torque is where it's at, and on that front, the six-cylinder delivers. A maximum of 405 pound-feet is available from 2,000-2,250 rpm, with grunt being sent through an electronically-controlled six-speed automatic transmission before making its way to a permanent all-wheel drive system with a standard rear-biased torque split of 38:62 (front-to-rear). The other mechanicals hidden beneath the sheet metal are typical Cayenne fare, including an independent sport-tuned front and rear suspension, generous six-piston monobloc front and four-piston monobloc rear brakes, and five different available wheel/tire combos (our test vehicle was wearing 19-inch wheels wrapped in 275/45R19 rubber). Ready to roll, the whole package tips the scales …Hide Full Review