2010 Mercury Milan

MSRP ?

$21,860 - $28,480
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Engine Engine 2.5LI-4
MPG MPG 22 City / 31 Hwy
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2010 Milan Overview

2010 Mercury Milan Hybrid - Click above for high-res gallery At the LA Auto Show in November, Ford unveiled the updated 2010 Fusion and its hybrid stablemate to considerable fanfare. When we got the chance to drive the Fusion a month later we came away impressed, although some of you found the new, larger three-bar grille even more obnoxious than the original. Since visual appeal is highly subjective, it's fortunate that Ford hasn't killed off the Mercury brand just yet. For a relatively minimal investment, Ford can offer the same mechanical package in a more understated wrapper and the result is this: the 2010 Mercury Milan Hybrid. Under the skin and between the axles, it's indistinguishable from its Fusion counterpart. But up front, it's an entirely different story. The Milan is equipped with the standard vertical bar grille shared by the rest of the Mercury line-up, but there's more to making a Mercury than a bit of rhinoplasty and a new set of badges. Make the jump to find out what they are. %Gallery-45938% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. At the front, the Milan's new nose is a bit more rounded than its predecessor, with the area surrounding the grille now standing out a bit from the bumper and flowing smoothly into the hood. Instead of the power dome found on the Fusion, the Milan has two chamfered edges that extend back to the base of the A-pillars. The new headlights actually appear closer to those found on the previous Fusion, with a taller, narrower stacked appearance compared to the 2009 Milan. At the rear, the shape of the tail-lights is basically the same, although the details of the cluster design are changed. The back bumper is more smoothly integrated, with less visual offset from the rest of the body. Even with the major refresh for the 2010 model year, the basic profile of the Milan and Fusion hasn't really changed, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. Because Americans have largely forsaken coupe and wagon body styles for cars over the past two decades, the Milan, like most other mainstream cars, is now only available in a four-door sedan. The profile may not be the most exciting in the world, but it's clean and handsome. The proportions of the three-box shape and the relatively low roof profile give a sporty overall effect. Unfortunately, the same roof-line that keeps the Milan from looking top-heavy also means that, when equipped with the optional sliding sun-roof, rear seat head-room is significantly degraded for six-footers and up. However, leg-room remains plentiful in the back as well as the front. In the command position, the Milan has the same interior as the Fusion -- again, a good thing in our experience. Even on the pre-production example we sampled, everything was tightly screwed together with nice soft-touch materials and logically laid out controls. The front seats are very comfortable and supportive, covered in fabric made from 100% post-industrial recycled materials. Unlike …
Full Review

2010 Milan Overview

2010 Mercury Milan Hybrid - Click above for high-res gallery At the LA Auto Show in November, Ford unveiled the updated 2010 Fusion and its hybrid stablemate to considerable fanfare. When we got the chance to drive the Fusion a month later we came away impressed, although some of you found the new, larger three-bar grille even more obnoxious than the original. Since visual appeal is highly subjective, it's fortunate that Ford hasn't killed off the Mercury brand just yet. For a relatively minimal investment, Ford can offer the same mechanical package in a more understated wrapper and the result is this: the 2010 Mercury Milan Hybrid. Under the skin and between the axles, it's indistinguishable from its Fusion counterpart. But up front, it's an entirely different story. The Milan is equipped with the standard vertical bar grille shared by the rest of the Mercury line-up, but there's more to making a Mercury than a bit of rhinoplasty and a new set of badges. Make the jump to find out what they are. %Gallery-45938% Photos Copyright ©2009 Sam Abuelsamid / Weblogs, Inc. At the front, the Milan's new nose is a bit more rounded than its predecessor, with the area surrounding the grille now standing out a bit from the bumper and flowing smoothly into the hood. Instead of the power dome found on the Fusion, the Milan has two chamfered edges that extend back to the base of the A-pillars. The new headlights actually appear closer to those found on the previous Fusion, with a taller, narrower stacked appearance compared to the 2009 Milan. At the rear, the shape of the tail-lights is basically the same, although the details of the cluster design are changed. The back bumper is more smoothly integrated, with less visual offset from the rest of the body. Even with the major refresh for the 2010 model year, the basic profile of the Milan and Fusion hasn't really changed, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. Because Americans have largely forsaken coupe and wagon body styles for cars over the past two decades, the Milan, like most other mainstream cars, is now only available in a four-door sedan. The profile may not be the most exciting in the world, but it's clean and handsome. The proportions of the three-box shape and the relatively low roof profile give a sporty overall effect. Unfortunately, the same roof-line that keeps the Milan from looking top-heavy also means that, when equipped with the optional sliding sun-roof, rear seat head-room is significantly degraded for six-footers and up. However, leg-room remains plentiful in the back as well as the front. In the command position, the Milan has the same interior as the Fusion -- again, a good thing in our experience. Even on the pre-production example we sampled, everything was tightly screwed together with nice soft-touch materials and logically laid out controls. The front seats are very comfortable and supportive, covered in fabric made from 100% post-industrial recycled materials. Unlike …Hide Full Review