2010 MINI Cooper

MSRP ?

$18,800 - $24,250
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Engine Engine 1.6LI-4
MPG MPG 28 City / 37 Hwy
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2010 Cooper Overview

2010 Mini Cooper 50 Camden Edition - Click above for high-res image gallery It's hard to believe, but the Mini brand just turned 50. Nevermind the huge gap in new model production until BMW bought the pint-sized automaker in the early 2000s, but the name Mini as we know it has been around for half a century. It's over the hill, though still looking good for its age. To celebrate, Mini created two special edition packages for the Cooper hatchback – the Mayfair and Camden – named after two of London's trendiest boroughs. And while the extra kit doesn't provide a performance boost or driving enhancements, they do add some extra cheekiness to the already-cute Cooper. We recently spent some time with the Camden package fitted to a base Cooper hatchback. The most notably addition is the talking Mission Control system, and while we always enjoy spending time with special editions of our favorite cars, our test run in this Cooper did more than provide us with a few gee-whiz features to show our friends. You see, we hadn't driven a base, non-turbocharged Cooper in a very long time, and while we certainly love the S and John Cooper Works models, there's a lot to be said about the bottom-rung of the Cooper range. Follow the jump to find out what. %Gallery-95999% Photos by Steven J. Ewing / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Visually, the Camden package adds a choice of special paint colors (White Silver Metallic in this case), white pin stripes on the mirrors, xenon headlamps, front foglamps, appropriate badges on the sides, grille and door sills, and unique 17-inch Silver Shield wheels. We like what we see, though we're still arguing with ourselves over whether those alloys get a full-fledged thumbs-up or thumbs-down. While we don't dislike them, we'd honestly prefer something more akin to the traditional eight-spoke design found on the Cooper S. Moving inside, the Camden package is nicely applied to the cabin, where a white and black theme is present throughout. It's sharp and fits well with the voguish theme that Mini has going on inside its offerings. That same white pin striping from the outside mirrors is found on the plastic dash materials, and if we're honest, the interior design is what garnered the most positive feedback from passengers. We appreciate the upgraded Harmon/Kardon premium sound system that comes as a part of the Camden package, especially since we find the standard Mini audio system to be a bit weak for pumping out the jams. Spruced-up design aside, the Mini's interior is growing a bit tiresome for our tastes. After all these years, we're still having trouble getting used to the controls on the center stack. We've lost track of how many times we've gone to adjust the volume and inadvertently changed the audio track on the CD player, and while the dinner plate-sized speedometer is a fun throwback to the original Minis from the 60s, we'd much rather see that space allocated …
Full Review

2010 Cooper Overview

2010 Mini Cooper 50 Camden Edition - Click above for high-res image gallery It's hard to believe, but the Mini brand just turned 50. Nevermind the huge gap in new model production until BMW bought the pint-sized automaker in the early 2000s, but the name Mini as we know it has been around for half a century. It's over the hill, though still looking good for its age. To celebrate, Mini created two special edition packages for the Cooper hatchback – the Mayfair and Camden – named after two of London's trendiest boroughs. And while the extra kit doesn't provide a performance boost or driving enhancements, they do add some extra cheekiness to the already-cute Cooper. We recently spent some time with the Camden package fitted to a base Cooper hatchback. The most notably addition is the talking Mission Control system, and while we always enjoy spending time with special editions of our favorite cars, our test run in this Cooper did more than provide us with a few gee-whiz features to show our friends. You see, we hadn't driven a base, non-turbocharged Cooper in a very long time, and while we certainly love the S and John Cooper Works models, there's a lot to be said about the bottom-rung of the Cooper range. Follow the jump to find out what. %Gallery-95999% Photos by Steven J. Ewing / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Visually, the Camden package adds a choice of special paint colors (White Silver Metallic in this case), white pin stripes on the mirrors, xenon headlamps, front foglamps, appropriate badges on the sides, grille and door sills, and unique 17-inch Silver Shield wheels. We like what we see, though we're still arguing with ourselves over whether those alloys get a full-fledged thumbs-up or thumbs-down. While we don't dislike them, we'd honestly prefer something more akin to the traditional eight-spoke design found on the Cooper S. Moving inside, the Camden package is nicely applied to the cabin, where a white and black theme is present throughout. It's sharp and fits well with the voguish theme that Mini has going on inside its offerings. That same white pin striping from the outside mirrors is found on the plastic dash materials, and if we're honest, the interior design is what garnered the most positive feedback from passengers. We appreciate the upgraded Harmon/Kardon premium sound system that comes as a part of the Camden package, especially since we find the standard Mini audio system to be a bit weak for pumping out the jams. Spruced-up design aside, the Mini's interior is growing a bit tiresome for our tastes. After all these years, we're still having trouble getting used to the controls on the center stack. We've lost track of how many times we've gone to adjust the volume and inadvertently changed the audio track on the CD player, and while the dinner plate-sized speedometer is a fun throwback to the original Minis from the 60s, we'd much rather see that space allocated …Hide Full Review