2010 Jeep Patriot

MSRP ?

$15,365 - $24,550
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
Hassle Free Quote
Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 23 City / 28 Hwy
More More View All Specs

2010 Patriot Overview

But do "substantial upgrades" and "class competitive" equal "nice interior?" Yes and no. First, here's what we liked: The comfy, leather-cladded seats in our tester provided great lateral support for both light off-roading and pedestrian errand-running. The leather-wrapped steering wheel had a great feel, and the switches and buttons were easily accessed, losing much of the cheap sensation of its predecessor. Our tester was also gussied with tastefully applied chrome appliqués that gave the otherwise stark black interior a kick of visual flare. Also included was a host of infotainment options that car buyers have come to expect. Navigation, MP3 connectivity, satellite radio, UConnect hands-free system and 30 gigs worth of storage are all present and accounted for, and it didn't take a degree from MIT to get everything to work properly. Chrysler's 6.5-inch navigation system may bet a bit out of date compared to other OEM systems on the market, but it wins on ease of use. We also enjoyed the 368-watt, nine-speaker Boston Acoustic sound system, which provides high quality sound at a reasonable cost. Two of those speakers are attached to the hatch and folds down when open – they're a perfect tailgating companion to be sure, but a bit flimsy-looking upon closer inspection. The upgraded sound system with the hard drive storage, moonroof and nav combine to be a $2,580 option; a relative bargain compared to other options on the market. Yet while the Patriot's interior has improved dramatically since its 2007 debut, there are a few remaining issues. Our "Limited" tester will set buyers back a hefty $30,510, placing it against much more polished competition, yet the doors and center arm rest are still covered with hard, unattractive plastics at the major touch points. The massive opening above the glove box is still an ergonomic oddity and running our hands over the edges reveals sharp plastic that just doesn't pass muster. In short, you get the sense that the Patriot has gone under the knife, but the surgeon only hacked out part of the cancer and is still charging you full price. Even worse is the powertrain. The Patriot continues to be saddled with an anemic 2.4-liter mill that provides the bare minimum of acceleration. We know we're talking about a 3,315-pound utility vehicle equipped with a Trail Rated 4WD system, but it would be nice to feel like we could get out of our own way when the need arises. That said, the Patriot's 172-horsepower, 165 pound-feet engine is perfectly adequate around town, but taking off from a stop or passing on the freeway can be a white-knuckled chore. And it's not like we're getting world-beating fuel economy in exchange for sacrificing get up and go. The Patriot's trip computer averaged just over 22 mpg during a week of mixed driving, which isn't horrible, but certainly not worth the four-pot's atrophied muscle. And while it doesn't feel like Chrysler's "World Engine" is working very hard, it sure sounds like a soprano without a …
Full Review

2010 Patriot Overview

But do "substantial upgrades" and "class competitive" equal "nice interior?" Yes and no. First, here's what we liked: The comfy, leather-cladded seats in our tester provided great lateral support for both light off-roading and pedestrian errand-running. The leather-wrapped steering wheel had a great feel, and the switches and buttons were easily accessed, losing much of the cheap sensation of its predecessor. Our tester was also gussied with tastefully applied chrome appliqués that gave the otherwise stark black interior a kick of visual flare. Also included was a host of infotainment options that car buyers have come to expect. Navigation, MP3 connectivity, satellite radio, UConnect hands-free system and 30 gigs worth of storage are all present and accounted for, and it didn't take a degree from MIT to get everything to work properly. Chrysler's 6.5-inch navigation system may bet a bit out of date compared to other OEM systems on the market, but it wins on ease of use. We also enjoyed the 368-watt, nine-speaker Boston Acoustic sound system, which provides high quality sound at a reasonable cost. Two of those speakers are attached to the hatch and folds down when open – they're a perfect tailgating companion to be sure, but a bit flimsy-looking upon closer inspection. The upgraded sound system with the hard drive storage, moonroof and nav combine to be a $2,580 option; a relative bargain compared to other options on the market. Yet while the Patriot's interior has improved dramatically since its 2007 debut, there are a few remaining issues. Our "Limited" tester will set buyers back a hefty $30,510, placing it against much more polished competition, yet the doors and center arm rest are still covered with hard, unattractive plastics at the major touch points. The massive opening above the glove box is still an ergonomic oddity and running our hands over the edges reveals sharp plastic that just doesn't pass muster. In short, you get the sense that the Patriot has gone under the knife, but the surgeon only hacked out part of the cancer and is still charging you full price. Even worse is the powertrain. The Patriot continues to be saddled with an anemic 2.4-liter mill that provides the bare minimum of acceleration. We know we're talking about a 3,315-pound utility vehicle equipped with a Trail Rated 4WD system, but it would be nice to feel like we could get out of our own way when the need arises. That said, the Patriot's 172-horsepower, 165 pound-feet engine is perfectly adequate around town, but taking off from a stop or passing on the freeway can be a white-knuckled chore. And it's not like we're getting world-beating fuel economy in exchange for sacrificing get up and go. The Patriot's trip computer averaged just over 22 mpg during a week of mixed driving, which isn't horrible, but certainly not worth the four-pot's atrophied muscle. And while it doesn't feel like Chrysler's "World Engine" is working very hard, it sure sounds like a soprano without a …Hide Full Review