EX-L 4dr 4x4
2010 Honda CR-V

MSRP ?

$27,745
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Smart Buy Market Avg. ?

N/A
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Engine Engine 2.4LI-4
MPG MPG 21 City / 27 Hwy
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2010 CR-V Overview

2010 Honda CR-V - Click above for high-res image gallery The Honda CR-V charged into the breach back in 1996, showing traditional SUV buyers that a rapier could work as well as a broadsword. When gas prices turned the body-on-frame market topsy-turvy, might didn't necessarily equal right. The meek crossover inherited the Earth, or at least a lot of conquest sales from former SUV buyers. The CR-V lead this charge against traditional SUVs and following a complete makeover in 2007 it surged to the top of the sales charts. This supposedly weak little softroader stole the SUV sales crown from atop the Ford Explorer's head where it had sat untouched for 15 years from 1991 through 2006. But the battlefield has changed and the 2010 Honda CR-V is facing formidable challengers on all sides. Most offer a V6 engine, having grown in size and power to resemble those mid-size SUVs they once displaced. Rather than bulk up the CR-V with an optional V6, Honda did what Honda does best and just made its four-cylinder better. The 2010 model is armed with 14 more horsepower and a long list of standard and optional equipment. So... is the CR-V this segment's once and future king or is time to crown another? Read on to find out. %Gallery-84992% Photos by Frank Filipponio / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. All-new back in 2007, the 2010 updates include a redesigned front fascia with fresh horizontal chrome slats in the grille and a honeycomb insert cut into the bumper. It's not bad, except the severe underbite in that front fascia. Think Billy Bob Thornton in Slingblade, minus the homicidal urges. The hood has been re-contoured in the freshening process, although you probably would have missed it if we hadn't told you. This newest CR-V still has the same Outback-aping lower cladding and controversially curved D-pillar in profile, but the rear bumper gets a bit of liposculpturing to differentiate it from the '09. It's not a bad look overall, but compared to the more straightforward shape of the previous generation, it's no Lancelot either. Our "Polished Metal Metallic" (new for '10) EX-L also sported the new split five spoke (a.k.a. 10-spoke) 17-inch alloy wheels that you'll find on EX and EX-L models. They look great and although they don't quite fill out the wheel-wells, they do manage to keep this thing from looking too much like a hippo on roller skates. Once praised for its tidy dimensions, the 2010 CR-V is larger than its forebears, but now finds itself in a class with vehicles like the Chevrolet Equinox that are up to eight inches longer, or ones offering (admittedly compromised) three-row seating like the Toyota RAV-4. Ironically, that means many of these compact CUVs are now just as big as the mid-size SUVs they dethroned. Prices have climbed too, and although this CR-V is competitive at its loaded sticker of $30,455, several of its rivals give you a V6 option for that money, which the CR-V does …
Full Review

2010 CR-V Overview

2010 Honda CR-V - Click above for high-res image gallery The Honda CR-V charged into the breach back in 1996, showing traditional SUV buyers that a rapier could work as well as a broadsword. When gas prices turned the body-on-frame market topsy-turvy, might didn't necessarily equal right. The meek crossover inherited the Earth, or at least a lot of conquest sales from former SUV buyers. The CR-V lead this charge against traditional SUVs and following a complete makeover in 2007 it surged to the top of the sales charts. This supposedly weak little softroader stole the SUV sales crown from atop the Ford Explorer's head where it had sat untouched for 15 years from 1991 through 2006. But the battlefield has changed and the 2010 Honda CR-V is facing formidable challengers on all sides. Most offer a V6 engine, having grown in size and power to resemble those mid-size SUVs they once displaced. Rather than bulk up the CR-V with an optional V6, Honda did what Honda does best and just made its four-cylinder better. The 2010 model is armed with 14 more horsepower and a long list of standard and optional equipment. So... is the CR-V this segment's once and future king or is time to crown another? Read on to find out. %Gallery-84992% Photos by Frank Filipponio / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. All-new back in 2007, the 2010 updates include a redesigned front fascia with fresh horizontal chrome slats in the grille and a honeycomb insert cut into the bumper. It's not bad, except the severe underbite in that front fascia. Think Billy Bob Thornton in Slingblade, minus the homicidal urges. The hood has been re-contoured in the freshening process, although you probably would have missed it if we hadn't told you. This newest CR-V still has the same Outback-aping lower cladding and controversially curved D-pillar in profile, but the rear bumper gets a bit of liposculpturing to differentiate it from the '09. It's not a bad look overall, but compared to the more straightforward shape of the previous generation, it's no Lancelot either. Our "Polished Metal Metallic" (new for '10) EX-L also sported the new split five spoke (a.k.a. 10-spoke) 17-inch alloy wheels that you'll find on EX and EX-L models. They look great and although they don't quite fill out the wheel-wells, they do manage to keep this thing from looking too much like a hippo on roller skates. Once praised for its tidy dimensions, the 2010 CR-V is larger than its forebears, but now finds itself in a class with vehicles like the Chevrolet Equinox that are up to eight inches longer, or ones offering (admittedly compromised) three-row seating like the Toyota RAV-4. Ironically, that means many of these compact CUVs are now just as big as the mid-size SUVs they dethroned. Prices have climbed too, and although this CR-V is competitive at its loaded sticker of $30,455, several of its rivals give you a V6 option for that money, which the CR-V does …Hide Full Review